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Who is first in line for a coronavirus vaccine? New info shows priority filled with risk



New information released by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows future priorities for a potential coronavirus vaccine may be full of risk.

As the discussion of priority groups entered the spotlight on Thursday, the coronavirus continues to be a challenge, as studies show that pregnant women infected with the virus may be at greater risk of hospitalization than women who are not pregnant. The study also cited racial differences among COVID-positive pregnant women, with Latin American women showing the highest infection rate of 46 percent.

PREGNANT WOMEN WITH CORONAVIRUS MORE HOSPITALIZING CDC PRODUCTS

While pregnant women are normally the last to receive a new vaccine due to a large number of caution, the reports suggest that they should be near the front of the proverbial line.

But, the question remains: who would get involved in the board?

While Science Magazine reported on Friday that the coronavirus̵

7;s disproportionate charge on the elderly could put them near the top, they often also have the weakest response to vaccines. Healthcare workers and important employees would probably also be at the forefront of the discussion. But there are other factors to consider, and about four billion doses would be needed to vaccinate the world’s priority populations.

At the end of June, the WHO presented its “Global Allocation Framework” to the member countries. They wrote that three groups – about two billion people – should receive priority vaccinations: healthcare professionals, adults over 65, and adults with comorbidities.

This comes when a subgroup of the CDC’s Immunization Practice Advisory Committee (ACIP) developed its own five-level plan for the United States.

The first level of the system includes 12 million “critical” health care workers and “other” workers, with initial doses given to “medical, national security and other essential workers at highest risk.”

The second and third levels would distribute to 110 million other essential workers or Americans over the age of 65 who live in long-term care or have medical conditions that could potentially be fatal if combined with a COVID-19 infection.

The rest of the “general population” would receive a vaccine at the final levels.

These plans raise even more questions for many who note the vague categorizations of humans, as well as the disproportionate impact the virus has had on color groups.

ACIP is scheduled to meet again to discuss the issue in August and WHO plans to finalize “allocation plans” by the end of the summer.

Pharmacist Michael Witte wears heavy gloves when he opens a frozen package of the potential vaccine against COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, the first day of a clinical trial in the first-stage safety study, Monday, March 16, 2020, at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle.  (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

Pharmacist Michael Witte wears heavy gloves when he opens a frozen package of the potential vaccine against COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, the first day of a clinical trial in the first-stage safety study, Monday, March 16, 2020, at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

According to data from the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center, there are now over 2.8 million confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States and just shy of over 130,000 deaths.

Assuming that the ambitious deadline for a vaccination rollout remains at the end of the year, what was little available would be a lack of supply and high demand.

On Thursday, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) told Dr. Anthony Fauci to the Journal of the American Medical Association that after months of experimental studies, vaccine candidates will enter late-stage clinical trials in late July.

“At least we may know if we are dealing with a safe and effective vaccine in the early winter, late winter, [or] early 2021, he said.

According to the Milken Institute, there are over a hundred vaccines under development.

But just two days before, Fauci had a serious warning to the American public.

In a hearing for the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Tuesday, Fauci told congressmen that new cases in the United States could daily surpass 100,000 new infections if the outbreak collapses uninterrupted in the midst of riots.

“I’m very worried and I’m not happy with what’s happening because we’re going in the wrong direction if you look at the curves in the new cases, so we really have to do something about it and we have to do it quickly,” he said to the senators.

Because states in the south and west are seeing worrying waves in cases and hospital influx levels – which now also take hold of the country’s youth – many state and local leaders have been forced to shut down companies once more or scale back the opening plans.

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With coronavirus, many scientific choices – such as prioritization – have turned into debates about ethics.

While challenge trials have been used to test vaccines against other diseases, there is no cure for COVID-19. That said, NIAID reportedly develops virus strains that can be used to infect participants.

Fox News Louis Casiano contributed to this report.


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