Home / Science / These Christmas videos of the space station's astronauts are simply delightful

These Christmas videos of the space station's astronauts are simply delightful



The astronauts have already covered the International Space Station's halls for the holidays, if any new videos are any indications.

Sporting Santa Hats, rookie Expedition 58 crew members David Saint-Jacques (Canadian Space Agency) and Anne McClain (NASA) played holiday greetings and memories from their orbital perch in a three-minute Christmas video. In the vicinity, the infamous Elf on the Shelf keeps track of having prowl around the space station for several days; The elf tries to fail to camouflage among the string of national flags behind the crew. (The astronauts are looking for eleven in a second adorable video.)

"We wanted to talk to you a little about what the holiday means to us, up here in orbit and on earth," McClain tells in a video released on Twitter Thursday ( December 20). Astronaut David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency (left) and NASA astronaut Anne McClain discuss what Christmas in space means to them in a video released on December 20, 201

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Astronaut David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency (left) and NASA astronaut Anne McClain discussing what Christmas in space means to them in a video released December 20, 2018.

Credit: NASA

"For me, of course, the holiday season a holiday, "adds Saint-Jacques, who grew up in the Montreal area. When he shares a microphone that is covered with what appears to be a red winter center, he continues: "I remember as a child spending most of … at one of my grandparents' homes and with cousins ​​and uncles and aunt and of course my brothers and my parents, and it was always a celebration, gifts and family life. That's what I remember most about the holiday season on earth. And of course no school. "

After taking the floating microphone from Saint-Jacques, McClain shares his own memory from childhood in Spokane, Washington; Turns out things have not changed much in almost four decades. "For me, the holiday season means that our parents lined up all the kids for pictures in front of the tree, which neither of us really liked doing so much. So maybe it is not so different here when we sit in front of the camera."

Astronauts show since the viewers some Christmas presents – in this case, food was filled in shiny cellophane. Saint-Jacques shows a little Canadian salmon while McClain pulls out turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and "plenty of desserts," she says, "Christmas dinner is not Christmas dinner unless it's 50 percent dessert."

In rapid succession, astronauts throw (carefully packaged) pies, cakes, turkeys and other cellophane wrapped edibles up to the roof of the Japanese Kibo module, where they filmed their short segments.

McClain adds that the crew of himself, Saint-Jacques and the four-hour space refugee Russian Oleg Kononenko are "very happy to be here, because we have a view of the planet [like] no one else" with the boundless earth reminds the people aboard the importance of unity and peace.

"It's also a good place to look back at your entire own track," Saint-Jacques adds. I look down on the earth, "I can see everywhere I've ever been from above. I can think of all the people I know and love. In one day I can fly anywhere they live."

The astronauts agree with holiday greetings in English and from the bilingual Saint-Jacques in French. McClain makes a quick somersault and Saint-Jacques "up to the roof and out of sight, McClain hot on his heels.

Most likely, their next mission to pick up all the food they threw up there and hope the Christmas dinner wasn't squashed. Although it did, it's fun. After all, in what other situation can adults throw food – all for public engagement in science?

Only hours before this video was published, 56-7 crew members Alexander Gerst (European Space Agency) expedition , Serena Auñón – Chancellor (NASA) and Sergey Prokopyev (Roscosmos) made a safe but still cold landing back in Kazakhstan, where they launched the spring heat on June 6. The remarkable 197-day stay in space included witnessing a Soyuz launch interrupt and manage leakage on their own Sojuz spacecraft, which fortunately was located on a part that was not needed for landing.

Their arrival on Earth entered concludes that the three-member Expedition 58 crew will work in itself during the better part of two months until the Expedition 59 crew is launched to join them on February 28th. Expedition 58's stay is expected to coincide with the launch of the first commercial crew vehicle test from SpaceX scheduled for January 7, to prepare for upcoming astronaut flights.

Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook. Original article on Space.com.


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