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The study reveals how Coronavirus travels indoors



FRIDAY, July 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) – A new study explains how coronavirus is affected by a turn on drops that are released when you cough, sneeze, talk or talk and travel around a room.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota hope their work will help schools and businesses take action to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission when they reopen.

For the study, they created a model for how these aerosols travel in indoor rooms, such rooms, elevators and supermarkets. They also compared how the virus did in different types of ventilation and with different distances between people in a room.

“You see a lot of people talking about the dangers of staying in cramped spaces, but no one gives a quantitative number,”

; said co-author Jiarong Hong, a senior lecturer in mechanical engineering.

“I think the biggest contribution we have made is to combine very accurate measurements and computational simulation simulations to give a very quantitative estimate of the risks,” he said in a university news release.

Researchers found that good ventilation can filter out some of the virus, but can leave it on surfaces.

In the classroom, they ran a simulation in which an asymptomatic teacher spoke for 50 minutes in a row. It was found that only 10% of the aerosols were filtered out. Most of the particles remained on the walls.

“Because this is very strong ventilation, we thought it would ventilate a lot of aerosols. But 10% is really a small number,” said co-author Suo Yang, assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

He noted that ventilation forms vortices – expelled aerosols rotate within these vortices rather than terminating, he said.

“When they collide with the wall, they attach to the wall,” Yang added. “But because they are basically caught in this vortex, and it is very difficult for them to reach the valve and actually go out.”

The researchers followed the airflow to find virus hotspots where the aerosols were collected in the room. They also found that the aerosols spread much less in space when the teacher was placed directly under an air valve.




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