Home / Entertainment / The John Wayne exhibit is removed from the University of California over his earlier racist statements

The John Wayne exhibit is removed from the University of California over his earlier racist statements



The School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California removes an exhibit for John Wayne from its main building due to the film legend’s racist and homophobic statements.

Wayne, who died in 1979, once said he did not feel guilty of slavery, said Indians tried to “selfishly try to keep” land for themselves and used homophobic slurs.

USC students protested for months against the Wayne exhibit on their campus because of the remarks, but demand that it be removed in recent weeks in light of the protests against racial equality.

The university’s associate dean for diversity and inclusion announced Friday that the decision had now been made to place the exhibition in an archive.

The School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California announced Friday that it will remove an exhibit for John Wayne from its main building following student protests

The School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California announced Friday that it will remove an exhibit for John Wayne from its main building following student protests

John Wayne exhibits at the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California

John Wayne exhibits at the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California

The movie legend spoke out against black people, Native Americans and the LGBTQ community in a 1971 interview with Playboy that recently emerged

The movie legend spoke out against black people, Native Americans and the LGBTQ community in a 1971 interview with Playboy that recently emerged

“I am writing to update you on the plans for the Wayne Exhibition, located in the main building of the School of Cinematic Arts Complex,” Evan Hughes wrote in a memo shared on Twitter.

“Conversations about systemic racism in our cultural institutions, along with the global civil uprising of the Black Lives Matter Movement, require that we consider the role that our school can play as a creator of change in promoting anti-racist cultural values ​​and experiences.

“Therefore, it has been decided that the Wayne exhibition be removed.”

Hughes thanked those who had expressed their views on the exhibition, which was first installed in 2012, and said the school was “grateful” for doing so.

He added that the contents of the exhibition would now be housed in the Cinematic Arts Library archive along with “other artifacts and papers of influential Hollywood figures”.

“Placing them in the right archival and research context allows scholarships to continue with the role that John Wayne’s films played in biohistory,” he wrote.

According to Fox News, Wayne attended USC in the 1920s on a scholarship and was a member of the football team.

The exhibition was founded in 2012 to honor Wayne, a USC graduate

The exhibition was founded in 2012 to honor Wayne, a USC graduate

USC's Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion Evan Hughes announced the decision in a memo shared on Twitter, saying that the exhibition's content would be transferred to an archive

USC’s Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion Evan Hughes announced the decision in a memo shared on Twitter, saying that the exhibition’s content would be transferred to an archive

Students and students had begun to protest the 2019 exhibition after the major comments Wayne made in a 1971 Playboy interview were resumed and shared widely online.

One student created a banner that read “by keeping Wayne’s legacy alive, SCA supports white superiority”.

In December last year, the school decided not to take the exhibition, but instead planned to expand domestic filmmaking, feminism and critical racial theory,

Friday’s decision comes two weeks after California Democrats also pushed to rename John Wayne Airport.

Orange County Democrats want to release their name, statue and other similarities from Santa Ana Airport because of the Playboy comments.

The Los Angeles Times reported that officials adopted an emergency resolution on June 26 to condemn Wayne’s “racist and big statements”.

“Earlier efforts have been made to get this done and now we put our name and our support to it to make a change of name,” said Ada Briceño, president of the Orange County Democratic Party.

Orange County Democrats want to remove all statues and other similarities of the late actor from John Wayne Airport and rename it because of his racist and big comments

Orange County Democrats want to remove all statues and other similarities of the late actor from John Wayne Airport and rename it because of his racist and big comments

They have called on the Orange County Board of Supervisors to change the name from John Wayne to Orange County Airport as part of a nationwide push in light of US racial history

They have called on the Orange County Board of Supervisors to change the name from John Wayne to Orange County Airport as part of a nationwide push in light of US racial history

According to those who drafted the resolution, the effort to remove Wayne, a resident of Orange County, is part of “a national movement to remove white supremacist symbols and names (that are) that are transforming American institutions, monuments, corporations, nonprofits. , sports leagues and teams.

They added that it is “widely acknowledged that racist symbols produce lasting physical and psychological stress and trauma, especially for black communities, people of color, and other oppressed groups, and the removal of racist symbols provides a necessary process for communities to remember historical acts of violence. and acknowledge the victims of oppression.

The resolution asked the Orange County Board of Supervisors to release its name, statue and other similarities from the international airport and “restore its original name: Orange County Airport”.

The airport had its name after The Duke after his death in 1979 of cancer, 72 years.

Wayne has been criticized for several years during an interview from Playboy Magazine from 1971 where he makes statements against black people, Indians and the LGBT community.

Calls for Wayne's name to be removed from the airport and for the exhibition to be removed come when protesters are targeting those who they believe are symbols of white supremacy and are pushing for them to be removed.  Picture John Wayne in a scene from 'El Dorado' 1967

Calls for Wayne’s name to be removed from the airport and for the exhibition to be removed come when protesters are targeting those who they believe are symbols of white supremacy and are pushing for them to be removed. Picture John Wayne in a scene from ‘El Dorado’ 1967

Wayne attended USC in the 1920s on a football scholarship and the exhibition was created in 2012

Wayne attended USC in the 1920s on a football scholarship and the exhibition was created in 2012

He said: ‘I believe in white superiority until the blacks are trained to a point of responsibility. I do not believe in giving authorities and positions of leadership and judgment to irresponsible people. ‘

Wayne also said that although he did not preach slavery, “I do not feel guilty that five or ten generations ago these people were slaves.”

The actor admitted that he felt no remorse in the submission of Native Americans.

“I don’t feel that we were wrong when we removed this amazing country from them. … (O) Your so-called stealing this land from them was just a matter of survival, he said.

“A large number of people needed a new country, and the Indians selfishly tried to keep it to themselves.”

Wayne called films like ‘Easy Rider’ and ‘Midnight Cowboy’ perverse, and used a gay slur to refer to the two main characters in the later film.

He was 63 when he made the comments.

Those who oppose renaming the airports and taking down the statues claim that Wayne cannot be judged on his comments because he lived in another era.

Wayne's youngest son Ethan (pictured) has stated and said his father was not a racist

Wayne’s youngest son Ethan (pictured) has stated and said his father was not a racist

His son has also defended his words claiming that his father was not a racist.

“Let me make one thing clear – John Wayne was not a racist. I know the term is randomly thrown these days, but I take it very seriously. I also understand how we came to this,” Ethan Wayne told Fox News.

There is no doubt that the words that John Wayne spoke in an interview 50 years ago have caused pain and anger. They also pained him, because he realized that his true feelings were conveyed incorrectly.

“The truth is, as we have seen in papers from his archives, he did not support” white supremacy “in any way and believed that responsible people should gain power without using force,” he added.

“He cried out in greatness when he saw it. He engaged and worked with people of all races, creeds and sexual orientations. John Wayne stood out for the very best of us all – a society that does not discriminate against anyone seeking the American dream. ‘

Ethan is Wayne’s youngest son and president of John Wayne Enterprises.


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