Home / Sports / The Houston Astros executive asked the Scouts to spy on other teams, the report says

The Houston Astros executive asked the Scouts to spy on other teams, the report says



As the Houston Astros are in hot water over allegations of cheating, a leaked email revealed a highly-ranked team leader asked the Scouts to spy on opponents until the 2017 season – hoping to steal signs or use specific technology to make that, according to Ken Rosenthal and Evan Drellich of The Athletic.

Kevin Goldstein, a Special Assistant to Astros General Manager Jeff Luhnow, allegedly sent the email in question. There are reports that indicate that the team used technology to steal signs during their 2017 World Series.

"One thing we are looking for is to pick up signs coming out of the dugout," said a message from August 17. . "What we are looking for is how much we can see, how we would log things, if we need cameras / binoculars etc. So go to the [the] game, see what you can [or can’t] do and report on your results. "

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The email was reportedly received from the outlet provided that the sender and recipients would remain anonymous.

MLB rules allow to steal signs from the grandstand only if they are stolen with their own eyes or binoculars and as long as they are not given to the team during the same game.

The report may be a smoking gun for Astro's front office commitment in stealing video technology signs. is currently investigating the organization after pitcher Mike Fiers told Athletic that the team used a live video feed to steal characters from opponents' team catchers and pass them on to hitters by beating in garbage.

  Kevin Goldstein, a special assistant for Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow, allegedly sent the email in question, following reports that indicate the team used technology to steal characters during his World Series-winning season in 2017.

Kevin Goldstein, a Special Assistant to Astros General Manager Jeff Luhnow, allegedly sent the email in question. It follows reports that the team used technology to steal characters during their World Series-winning season 2017.
(Houston Astros)

One play would mean a breaking ball, two bangs would mean a changeover and no bang would mean a fastball, according to the outlet.

The investigation went up this week as they try to confirm Fier's allegations.

Scouts within Astros also reportedly discussed stealing signs with managers on phone calls and a group of Slack channels. Some hesitated to join the system of fear to destroy "their reputation."

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"Nobody wanted to do it and not take the chance to get caught and just ruin their reputation a scout but then further damage what the Astros had gone, "said one person who participated in the talks according to The Athletic. [19659003]" It just goes to history, for 2017 we were asked to cheat electronically in the playoffs, "a scout added. [19659003] Earlier this year, the New York Yankees also accused the club of using another sound source to steal signs, saying that the Astros used distinct whistles during certain pitches when the team met in Game 1 of ALCS in mid-October.

The investigation went on up this week when MLB tried to confirm Fier's allegations.

"Technology and stealing information will be the black eye for this generation," a longtime Astros employee told ESP N. "It is really the last limit that is not prohibited. It's a way to gain a competitive edge without changing the actual players. "

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Those involved in the alleged cheating system include Astros manager AJ Hinch, Red Sox manager Alex Cora and New York Mets manager Carlos Beltran, who allegedly played a "key role in designing the character stealing system the team used that season," according to The Athletic.


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