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Women's strike: women take on the streets



"If the woman wants to stand still" – during this motto, women across Switzerland will walk the streets on Friday. (Photo: Joël Hunn / NZZ)

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Women take the streets across the country on the strike day. In Bern, the political operation has stood still, in Zurich traffic is no longer floating. But there are also women who work. We report continuously in words, images and sounds.

Erich Aschwanden, Philipp Gollmer, Angelika Hardegger, Linda Koponen, Christina Neuhaus, Larissa Rhyn, Lena Schenkel, Johanna Wedl, Conradin Zellweger

Important facts in brief

  • Switzerland's other major national women's races take place Friday – after 1991. The organizers speak in the big cities in tens of thousands of participants. More women are expected to enter the streets in the evening
  • The federal advisors Viola Amherd (cvp.) And Simonetta Sommaruga (sp.) Shown solidarity. Summer week requires more parental leave. The Federal Parliament has taken a strike
  • The women pay attention to their fears with colorful banners. Among other things, they demand higher wages and more, even at political level.
  • NZZ also reports on Twitter and Instagram about women's strike.
  Why do women earn less than men? Why is there no paid parental leave in Switzerland? And do tampons have to be so expensive? The nationwide women's strike on June 14 requires equality in everyday life. Photo: National council member Margret Kiener Nellen (SP, BE) with boxing gloves at the Bundesplatz in Bern. (Photo: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone) Why do women earn less than men? Why is there no paid parental leave in Switzerland? And do tampons have to be so expensive? The nationwide women's strike on June 14 requires equality in everyday life. Photo: National council member Margret Kiener Nellen (SP, BE) with boxing gloves at the Bundesplatz in Bern. (Image: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone)
  Female activists in Bern celebrate the day with great creativity. In Basel, artists have also composed a "hymn for the Swiss woman's Strike Day". And a women's strike radio reports on FM, DAB + and online from all parts of the country. (Image: Alessandro della Valle / Keystone) Female activists in Bern celebrate the day with great creativity. In Basel, artists have also composed a "hymn for the Swiss woman's Strike Day". And a women's strike radio reports on FM, DAB + and online from all parts of the country. (Image: Alessandro della Valle / Keystone)
  In some places, the woman's rally day is also a little quieter over the stage. At this house in Winterthur, a small flag of opportunity is noticed. In the middle of the city, however, there is also a larger rally. (Image: Melanie Duchène / Keystone) In some places, the woman's rally day is also a little quieter over the stage. At this house in Winterthur, a small flag of opportunity is noticed. In the middle of the city, however, there is also a larger rally. (Photo: Melanie Duchène / Keystone)
  Many activists visit Lucerne from 11 am to a rally. Today's highlights with rallies are scheduled to take place late in the afternoon. (Image: Alexandra Wey / Keystone) Many activists visit Lucerne from 11 am for a rally. Today's highlights with rallies are scheduled to take place late in the afternoon. (Image: Alexandra Wey / Keystone)
  These employees at a restaurant in Winterthur stop working at lunchtime during the best opening hours. The path on the facade reads: "Men cook with us!" It is not known if the food tasted like the regulars as well as on other days. (Image: Melanie Duchène / Keystone) These employees at a restaurant in Winterthur turned off their work at noon at today's best time. The path on the facade reads: "Men cook with us!" It is not known if the food tasted like the regulars as well as on other days. (Image: Melanie Duchène / Keystone)
  In connection with women's strike, one also discovers some known male faces. At the Bundesplatz in Bern lies the SP National Council Corrado Pardini (BE) on the grill and prepares hamburgers. (Picture: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone) In connection with women's strike, one also discovers some known male faces. At the Bundesplatz in Bern lies the SP National Council Corrado Pardini (BE) on the grill and prepares hamburgers. (Picture: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone)
  In Zurich's city, female activists who work in typical women's jobs and often earn less than men go out into the streets. These teachers organize a protest march through the Hottingen district. Probably they have received their documents approved by the school administration, and many use one day's leave to attend. (Walter Bieri / Keystone) Even in the city of Zurich, activists who work in typical women's professions and often earn less than men go out into the streets. These teachers organize a protest march through the Hottingen district. Probably they have received their documents approved by the school administration, and many use one day's leave to attend. (Walter Bieri / Keystone)
  About 10,000 women and men gather at Berner Bundesplatz in the morning to attend a large rally. Pan covers, horns, whistles, rattles and razor are used. An important requirement is that Switzerland must introduce one year paid maternity leave. (Image: Alessandro della Valle / Keystone) About 10,000 women and men gather at Berner Bundesplatz in the morning to attend a large rally. Pan covers, horns, whistles, rattles and razor are used. An important requirement is that Switzerland must introduce one year paid maternity leave. (Image: Alessandro della Valle / Keystone)
  The Venus symbol is unrepresented on the day of women's strike. This young participant marches on the demonstration for women's strike in Bern. She does not remember the first edition of the strike in 1991, but 28 years have passed since then. (Image: Alessandro della Valle / Keystone) The Venus symbol is unrepresented on the day of women's strike. This young participant marches on the demonstration for women's strike in Bern. She does not remember the first edition of the strike in 1991, but 28 years have passed since then. (Image: Alessandro della Valle / Keystone)
  Federal Councilor Simonetta Sommaruga (center) arrives at a women's lair in Lausanne, accompanied by many union representatives from the Vaud Canton. In the first edition of the national strike in 1991, the organizers talked about half a million participants. This time it should have been much more. (Image: Jean-Christophe Bott / Keystone) Federal Councilor Simonetta Sommaruga (center) arrives at a women's lair in Lausanne, accompanied by many trade union representatives from the Canton of Vaud. In the first edition of the national strike in 1991, the organizers talked about half a million participants. This time it should have been much more. (Image: Jean-Christophe Bott / Keystone)
  Two women draw a clitoral sculpture over the Hardbrücke in Zurich. In all cities of Switzerland from Aarau, Basel and Bern to Chur, Geneva and Lausanne to St. Various activities are planned for Gallen, Winterthur and Zurich. Even in rural areas, women's problem days are celebrated. (Image: Detlev Munz / Keystone) Two women draw a clitoral sculpture over the Hardbrücke in Zurich. In all cities of Switzerland from Aarau, Basel and Bern to Chur, Geneva and Lausanne to St. Various activities are planned for Gallen, Winterthur and Zurich. Even in rural areas, women's problem days are celebrated. (Image: Detlev Munz / Keystone)
  Many women in Lausanne also travel early in the morning. This group of activists organized a sit-in with breakfast at Pont Bessières. Unlike the first strike in 1991, the 2019 edition of regional colleagues was released, not centrally by the unions. (Image: Jean-Christophe Bott / Keystone) Even in Lausanne, many women are out early in the morning. This group of activists organized a sit-in with breakfast at Pont Bessières. Unlike the first strike in 1991, the 2019 edition of regional colleagues was released, not centrally by the unions. (Image: Jean-Christophe Bott / Keystone)
  In Lausanne, activists install sanitary napkins on street pavements. They want to point out that products that are indispensable for women cannot be charged at a standard rate of 7.7 percent and require a reduced rate of 2.5 percent. For this purpose, the petition "Bloody Unfair - down with the tampon tax" was handed over over 11,000 signatures on Friday (14.6). (Image: Jean-Christophe Bott / Keystone) In Lausanne, activists install sanitary napkins on street pavements. They want to point out that products that are indispensable for women cannot be charged at a standard rate of 7.7 percent and require a reduced rate of 2.5 percent. For this purpose, the petition "Bloody Unfair – down with the tampon tax" was handed over over 11,000 signatures on Friday (14.6). (Image: Jean-Christophe Bott / Keystone)
  The session takes place in Bern on Women's Strike Day, but the events under the federal dome differ from Courant normally. Many women appear in violet clothes, with pins and flags and other identification marks. Men also join: This is how Carlo Sommaruga (sp., GE) shows solidarity with women's strike. (Picture: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone) The session takes place in Berne on women's problem days, but the events under the federal dome differ from Courant normally. Many women appear in violet clothes, with pins and flags and other identification marks. Men also join: This is how Carlo Sommaruga (sp., GE) shows solidarity with women's strike. (Photo: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone)
  Making a selfie at the beginning of women's problem day (from left to right) is SP national advisor Nadine Masshardt, Yvonne Feri, Laurence Fehlmann Rille, Priska Seiler Graf, Barbara Gysi, Mattea Meyer and Jacqueline Badran. From 11 o'clock a national work stop is planned. The National Council also wants to interrupt its session for a strike break of a quarter of an hour. (Photo: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone) Make a selfish at the beginning of women's problems day (from left to right) SP national councilors Nadine Masshardt, Yvonne Feri, Laurence Fehlmann Rille, Priska Seiler Graf, Barbara Gysi, Mattea Meyer and Jacqueline Badran. From 11 o'clock a national work stop is planned. The National Council also wants to interrupt its session for a strike break of a quarter of an hour. (Photo: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone)
  Female activists project the logo of women's strike on the Roche Tower (13. 6.). The Strike day's focus is on equal pay for equal work, more part-time working models for women and men, and no tolerance for sexual violence. (Image: Georgios Kefalas / Keystone) Basel female activists project the logo of women's strike on the Roche tower (13. 6.). The Strike day's focus is on equal pay for equal work, more part-time working models for women and men, and no tolerance for sexual violence. (Image: Georgios Kefalas / Keystone)
  In the Cathedral of Lausanne, a male night watchman ("guet") usually calls every hour from 10am to 2am in the morning. At a women's riot day, a female night watchman temporarily takes over this office, which since 1405 was celebrated in Lausanne without interruption and is considered by the population to be an important use. (Image: Laurent Gillieron / Keystone) In the tower of the Lausanne Cathedral, a male guard ("guet") normally rings every hour from 10am to 2am in the morning. At a women's riot day, a female night watchman temporarily takes over this office, which since 1405 was celebrated in Lausanne without interruption and is considered by the population to be an important use. (Image: Laurent Gillieron / Keystone)

Women's strike – female Switzerland fighting for equal rights

What is talked about in social networks?

Women's strike takes place not only on the country's public squares, but also on the net the women spread their worries. In addition to general requirements such as higher wages, more gender equality opportunities in the workplace and more in politics, women also share very personal experiences of unequal treatment at the workplace on Twitter.

The women report discrimination because of their gender when they want to apply for a job or write a dissertation. The shared experiences have a clear focus: especially wives and young mothers suffer from discrimination.

A woman describes that she had been short-circuited on a pay break with the argument that her husband earned enough. A single mother reports on the implicit accusation of her male superior that she can show less commitment to the work because of her situation. Another tweet describes how a permanent job is best given to a man because he has a family to feed and a woman about 30 still fails soon because she has a child.

SRF has also raised the issue. In a short video, employees in SRF 1, SRF 3 and SRF Virus describe the absurd and outlandish things they must listen to.

The men are standing at the counter

The second major national women's problem day sees an extra number of women in the streets, It creates a feeling that Zurich is a purely female city. Only men can serve on the town because of the barracks area.

In the big cities people are preparing for the playoffs, in Zurich the demonstration starts at 17.00. Planned is a star march, the women flow from different directions to the starting point. The route leads from the central station at Bahnhofstrasse and Zurich's financial district to Helvetiaplatz, a place where the labor movement traditionally protests.

The women back against sexism this day. At Stauffacher in Zurich, a small group has gathered. On the floor there are gossip magazines with pictures of half-naked actresses and models. The activists resist the sexist depiction of women in the media. Their dissatisfaction expresses them with the wrong menstrual blood that they distribute on the images. Their motto: More bodypositivity.

How women work: Ursula Stierli's perspective, childhood teacher
  Ursula Stierli could not beat thirty years ago. She had just become a mother. (Photo: len. / NZZ)

About thirty years ago, Ursula Stierli could not knock out. She had just become a mother. (Photo:. / NZZ)

Do you still remember Bernhard Stierli, who went in for his wife in a kindergarten in Knonau in the morning? This is Ursula Stierli, who goes on strike on Friday and arrived at noon in Zurich Bäckeranlage to meet with colleagues. Like many preschool teachers, the 58-year-old will wear a yellow or orange hard hat later at the rally to draw attention to the various construction sites at the preschool. Among other things, they demand that their pay class increase to primary school.

"It would also make the profession more attractive to men completing joint training," says Stierli. She cannot understand why she works 100 percent and is employed at only 88 percent. As a result, she would receive less compensation for job loss – especially in her age this is a problem.

Stierli did not participate in the strike in 1991, because she had just given birth to her second child. She is happy that it worked this time and her husband represents her in kindergarten. He already reported the tumult that broke out there. "Now maybe he understands why I'm so exhausted sometimes in the evening," she says, laughing.

What men say about a woman's strike

One cannot find women's strike a good thing. But why do men usually embarrass when women stand in the foreground? A splendor of the domestic editor Daniel Gerny.

Switzerland could do more for women

An international comparison shows that although Switzerland does relatively well in terms of women's rights, there is room for improvement. For example, it receives poor marks from a non-governmental organization for the low proportion of women in parliament, for higher public services and in science and research. According to the study, Denmark is the most female country, but the situation is particularly uncertain for women in Chad.

Thousands of participants travel in Bern and Zurich

Buses in the center of Bern are late on Friday. Women have used office chairs to stop the traffic flow. The organizers estimate that about 10,000 women have taken to the streets.

The rally in Zurich Central has been approved. At the traffic connection near the central station, traffic at midnight is completely stopped. According to the organizers, about 10,000 protesters are on their way.

The women have tied wagons with metal bands to each other, which blocks the tram traffic. Not at all the measure is well received. An elderly past stops and shakes his head. "It has no meaning for me," he says. The police are in place with civilian clad groups. They are the point of contact for questions and mediate between demonstrators and the uniformed forces. The reaction to the strike is most positive, says one of the police. However, the blockade has also prevented ambulance vehicles from protecting and saving Zurich. The city police urge the participants to create space for the blue light organizations.

More and more people gather at Bäckeranlage, where traditional meetings of the labor movement take place.

  Many kindergarten teachers are on duty Friday at Bäckeranlage in Zurich. (Photo: len. / NZZ)

Many kindergarten teachers are on the bakery in Zurich on Friday. (Photo: len. / NZZ)

Why do women take the streets? Also because they require more political voice. They are still clearly in the minority in the parliament in Bern. In the National Council, the proportion of women has increased over the past thirty years from about 18 to 32 percent, in the Government from about 9 to 13 percent. While there was not a single woman in the Bundesrat in 1991, there are currently three: the liberal Karin Keller-Sutter, the Christian Democratic violin hardener and the Social Democrat Simonetta Sommaruga. But women are still clearly under-represented in politics. And the proportion of women only increases slowly – both at national level and in the cantons.

Why do women take the streets? A video report

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Women from all age groups beat Switzerland. The 18-year-old high school Aisha Wüthrich says she will not be taken seriously because of her gender. Therefore, she participates in the strike. Retired florist Katharina Zamboni earned less during her life than her male counterparts. She stands for more equal pay. The women tell the NZZ reporters in the video contribution.

This happened until noon

Women stand up for better childcare

"Yes, we care" are written on the violet sign that is being protested. It goes over Nydeggsbron in Bern, surrounded by prams. Time and money for good childcare or just taking care of, hundreds of women demand a march through Bern's old town. Most drive a stroller or hold a baby in their arms. Two discuss how to divide the household work with their partners.

Then the slogan struck: "Abe with the Boni, go with Kita-Löhn." Then a little boy asks his mother: "Mom, what are the bonuses?" She owes him the answer and agrees with him. Asian tourists look a little strange first in the light of the seemingly endless series of prams that meet them in central Bern. Then they enthusiastically shoot pictures. And remember that Switzerland is a very child-friendly country. About 5,000 people are said to have joined the stroller parade.

Demonstrations are ongoing

Demonstrations on women's riot day have begun in various Swiss cities. In Bern and Lausanne, the organizers announce that about 4,000 women are making their concerns known through various measures, compared to 2000 in Basel. In Friborg and Lucerne there are also about 1000 women in the streets. In the western part of Switzerland is also shown, for example in Biel or Sierre. In Zurich, due to a rally, traffic was stopped at the central station at the central station. Even the well-known singer Sophie Hunger has mixed with the audience, as a NZZ reporter reported. The official demonstration starts at. 17.00

In Zurich West, a restaurant offers women a discount of 18 percent, which applies to grills and ice cream. Women still earn less than men in many places, and the difference is nearly one-fifth.

What happens in the countryside?
 Nestled in pink, Wellmänndel presents itself in Schwyz. (Image: Ase. / NZZ)

Nestled in pink, Wellmänndel presents itself in Schwyz. (Image: Ase. / NZZ)

Schwyzer Brunnemänndel shows solidarity with the women on Friday
Women's strike is not a purely urban affair. Many events also occur in the countryside and in the urban area. Similarly in the Schwyz canton, which is not exactly one of the pioneers of equality.

Since 11.00, the organizers have met for a strike soup "I de Fabrik", where a few years ago handiworks were made. About twenty women make the last preparations for the afternoon. The atmosphere is good, although coordinator Brigitte Waser doesn't know how many participants can be mobilized for the afternoon rally at Schwyz's main square.

"We hope that Schwyz will be the focus of the strike in central Switzerland," Waser explains. After all, a man has already solidified in Schwyz with the women. "Well-known part" in the square, which a purple skirt and shoes were given to celebrate the day.

Women also work in Knonauer County, popularly called Säuliamt, on the strike day. Although Yvonne Leuthold wears purple – but not because of women's strike. The jacket is the one she likes to wear. "I have no time to beat," says the 55-year-old farmer from Knonau shopping. "I asked the cows, but they didn't want to," she jokes.

Since she and her husband go on vacation in a week – which is rare enough – it was just stressful on the farm. She would not strike otherwise, she says, but she does not care if other women do. However, with regard to women's farmers, she finds that women should also have a stronger expression and social security should demand of their men. "A farmer who refuses to do so has a bad character," she says.

MPs strike: not only men should be determined

At 11am women will leave their workplaces and at 11 o'clock they squeeze on killing screams and whistles over the Bundesplatz. The strike break in parliament has begun. The parliamentarians go through the people and applaud frantically. SP's national council member Margret Kiener-Nellen ventures out on a shaky ladder, which is kept immediately and stretches its fist into a red boxing glove in the air.

Most of them remain national councilors, the SP has clearly prevailed – as far as this is to be assessed in the crowd. Strike break yes, strikes, parliamentarians do not want to have. Regula Rytz explains this to those who stand over the speaker: "We women have fought for our political rights for so long that we today do not just want to let the men vote." Said, and already the parliamentarians are going back – they have suffered a little bit of their strike break, however, it is already 11. 25.

During the strike break of the National Council, left-wing politicians are mainly to see. Bourgeois parliamentarians prefer to make the strike day institutional. You have presented several proposals aimed at better reconciliation of family and work. For example, they require external child allowance deductions or counseling for women who find it difficult to find a job after a child crime.

Visit to Säuliamt: A kindergarten teacher goes on strike – her husband jumps in
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The picture above shows Bernhard Stierli, 60, in a kindergarten in Knonau in Zurich Säuliamt. He usually works as an architect but today he represents his wife so that she can beat. It is also his gift for her 33-year wedding day today. He just drops in chaos. After the children did their homework first, they also realized that they can afford more today because their kindergarten teachers have flown out. Frisbees and Styrofoam particles fly straight through the air, a stierli still sticks in the gray hair.

Stierli teaches one day at a vocational school, but of course it goes back and forth differently. "I didn't think an adult would be perceived as much as a government official," says. He is surprisingly calm and happy to "experience something different". The parents were not informed: "A strike must be unannounced," says Stierli. His wife was still there in the morning to greet. In her office, a colleague has taken over the necessary site visits, which do not strike today. Stierli was for a long time opposed to the idea that some injustices would depend on sex. But after his wife has repeatedly pointed to specific cases in recent years, he also believes in it. The deciding factor was an act that his wife launched and helped – and in the end he was only mentioned. We will later learn why his wife is fighting today and what requirements she has in common with many other kindergarten teachers.

What do women's dealers do? Inspection in Zurich's business

In a supermarket somewhere in Zurich's Kreis 3, women still fill the shelves and serve the coffins. Women's strike is not a problem for them, says one salesman. "In the retail business you can't afford anything." If her employer were to show advantage when she stopped working, she doubted – especially since the team was almost entirely composed of women.

The fact that retailing does not go to strike also leads to the employees' nationalities. This is even less a problem among foreigners. "The Swiss are more brave in such matters." But she doubts whether such measures can make any difference. Ultimately, it's a pity for yourself. And how are the men on strike? "They make fun of the highest."

10:30 clock Federal Councilor Viola Amherd shows solidarity [194559075]

Violet splash of color in parliament
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In Parliament, Courant applies normally. Besides that in the Riksdag Council, a little more color spies than usual. The majority of left-wing parliamentarians – and many of their fellow men's counterparts – have purple scarves tied around their neck, around their wrists or around their heads.

The lengths are tightly filled. No one seems to be on strike here. However, MEPs have decided to beat at 15 o'clock in the quarter.

Cheaper taxes required: Arrival of Giant Tampon
 (Image: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone)

(Image: Peter Klaunzer / Keystone)

In Bern Starts Striking at the Power Center: Activists and activists cross the Bundeskanzle the Petition "Bloody Unfair: Runter with the Tamponsteuer". As a result, hygiene articles were suggested as Tampons and Binders.

Roaming bullets with 2.5% were left with 7.7% – and this was recognized as the guesswork. Two activists are tending to a huge Tampon on the Bundesplatz, who has depicted their human race, which appeals to them. Regular will see the pamphlet to the Parliament – separate man in the security control.

Federal conquest: Simonetta Summer cabin: «Needed at least 16 months of age»
 Bundesrätin Simonetta Summer cottage in visit to activists in Lausanne (Image / Jean- Christophe Bott)

Bundesrätin Simonetta Summer visit to activists in Lausanne (Bild / Jean-Christophe Bott)

Six years, the Bundesrätin Simonetta is summer cottage for the fun. In a "Swiss industry" interview to Frauenstreik, they are under the influence of the longevity. "That women still need more than 600 francs than those men for a month in the area, but if they were their wife, a scandal would be," they say. Particularly disturbing the forefront, women mostly trade better. "Women are certainly not self-guilty, because they were discriminated against at Lohn! Someone who feels lazy about having a wife – not being a woman – is having a problem with the law. ”She said she was discriminated against. At one of your earliest sets, they deserve massive wetter than their own. "Then I typically responded: I swear, out of fear, that I lose the job, if more Lohn wishes. I thought I must prove to the boss that I am the money. ”

Summer day spoils that in the Swiss Work Environment that Vaterschaft is barely found. «Become a Man, so hot: Congratulations! Then there was more to it. Then one wonders, that there are no women in the professions… ”, say to the Swiss company. On the question, the Bundesrätin was told: "16 Monate Elternzeit – hearing belongs to at least Monate the Winter." So dies etwa said in Sweden that case. By no means did they sell themselves, with some self-explanatory moth with two or three children in the foothold positions. This propensity is much brighter if the Bundesrat still has the minimum solution of two weeks of water supply for the next three weeks.

This summer, more men are working in the Teilzeit framework functions. You have a number of men in your staff who work for you. Es seien vorwiegend 80-Prozent-Stellen, verbunden mit einem Tag Home-Office. «Männer, die für ihre Kinder Verantwortung übernehmen, werden heute von Chefs leider oft noch als nicht vollwertig angeschaut», fügt die UVEK-Chefin an. Schnell heisse es: «Der ist doch nicht wirklich motiviert.» Solange das so sei, würden auch Frauen in Teilzeitfunktionen nicht ernst genommen.

Eine Medienschau: Wie kommentieren die Zeitungen den Frauenstreik?

In den Kommentarspalten der Zeitungen ist der Frauenstreik heute DAS Thema. «Dieser Feminismus ist eine Wucht», titelt etwa der «Tages-Anzeiger». Die neue Frauenbewegung passe in keine Schublade und lasse sich parteipolitisch nicht klar verorten. Auch Männer würden sich zunehmen für die Anliegen von Frauen stark machen, heisst es. Die Titel von CH-Media schreiben, die Zeiten seien besser als 1991, beim ersten nationalen Frauenstreik.

Trotzdem sei es wichtig, die Anliegen der Gleichstellung auf die Strasse zu tragen – «bis die Gleichstellung zwischen Frauen und Männern kein Thema mehr ist». Ähnlich lautet die Schlagzeile im Blick. «Nie wieder Frauenstreik!», titelt das Boulevard-Blatt und zählt auf, was sich ändern müsse, «damit es einen Tag wie heute nicht mehr braucht». Für den Blick ist aber auch klar: «Mit Nichtstun wird sich nichts ändern.» Die Zeitung ruft die Frauen dazu auf, eine «Gestalterinnenrolle» zu übernehmen. Und was sagt die NZZ zum Frauenstreik? Lesen Sie es hier:

09:35 Uhr, Bern: Bundesrätin Simonetta Sommaruga ist neu auch auf Twitter
Internationale Medienhäuser berichten
Ein Frauenstreik-Kollektiv kapert Roche-Tower
Der Empfang im Bundeshaus: In Bern ist der violette Teppich ausgerollt

Ins Bundeshaus schreiten Parlamentarierinnen und Parlamentarier heute auf einem lila Teppich. Jacqueline Badran freut es.

Der Streik beginnt: Mitternächtliche Trommelwirbel in Zürich

Vielerorts hat der Frauenstreik bereits um Mitternacht mit einigem Lärm begonnen, so auch in der Stadt Zürich. An die 100 Frauen und vereinzelte Männer versammelten sich etwa am Goldbrunnenplatz in Wiedikon. In lila T-Shirts, mitunter auch maskiert und verkleidet, trommelten sie mit Kochlöffeln gegen Pfannendeckel, schlugen diese aneinander oder schwangen Holzratschen. Manche stimmten das Lied «Es wott es Froueli z'Streike (und eben nicht z’Märit) ga». Fünfzehn Minuten dauerte das Streiksignal, das so manche Anwohner auf den Balkon lockte und den Bus- und Tramverkehr kurzzeitig zum Erliegen brachte – getreu dem mitgeführten Transparent «Ohne uns steht alles still.» Einige der Frauen zogen danach weiter an die Langstrasse, wo ein hupender Autokorso ebenfalls den Streiktag ankündigte.

Mitternacht

Die Ausgangslage

Sogar ein Bundesrat hat zum Streik aufgerufen.

Einen Tag vor dem Frauenstreik hat Innenminister Alain Berset auf Twitter ein Video veröffentlicht. Die Botschaft: «Die Gleichstellung von Frau und Mann ist noch immer nicht Realität.» «Wir müssen das endlich ändern.» «Jetzt #14Juni2019.»

In den Medien war der Frauenstreik in den letzten Wochen omnipräsent. Die «Weltwoche» hat den Frauen im Hinblick auf den Streik eine Sonderausgabe gewidmet, die linke «WoZ» sowieso. Die Zeitschrift «Beobachter» kam für einmal als «Beobachterin» raus. Zum ersten Mal in der Geschichte der Zeitschrift hat eine Frau das Editorial geschrieben.

Der Frauenstreik 2019 könnte also gross werden. Bloss:

Was wird am Frauenstreiktag eigentlich passieren?

Die Schweiz wird nicht stillstehen. Arbeitsniederlegungen sind zwar angekündigt. Es wird aber vor allem Protestpausen, Demonstrationen, Versammlungen oder Flashmobs geben. Der Streik hat kein festes Programm. Die Gruppen in den Regionen haben ganz unterschiedliche Aktionen geplant. In Schaffhausen wollen Frauen zum Beispiel in Pussyhats im Rhein schwimmen. In Bern ist ein Kinderwagenumzug angesagt. In Zürich haben Aktivistinnen unter anderem eine «Klitoris-Wanderung», ein Streik-Picknick mit Bäuerinnen und eine Aktion mit dem Titel «Menstruieren aufs Patriarchat» organisiert. In Domat-Ems, Graubünden, gibt es einen Z'Mittag auf dem Dorfplatz mit anschliessendem Marsch zur Kundgebung nach Chur.

Vielerorts sind die ersten grossen Aktivitäten auf 11 Uhr angesagt. Um 15 Uhr 24 rufen die Gewerkschaften die Frauen dazu auf, die Arbeit niederzulegen. Laut den Gewerkschaften ist das die Uhrzeit, ab der Frauen aufgrund der Lohndifferenz zu den Männern gratis arbeiten.

Am späten Nachmittag finden grössere Kundgebungen in den Städten statt, darunter in Zürich, Bern, Basel, Aarau, Luzern, St. Gallen und Chur. Eine nationale Demonstration wird es nicht geben.

Was fordert der Frauenstreik?

Viele regionale Komitees oder Branchengruppen haben eigene Manifeste verfasst. Führende Figuren beim Katholischen Frauenbund fordern zum Beispiel die Öffnung des Priestertums für alle und die Abschaffung des Zölibats. Frauen aus der Wirtschaft verlangen mehr Frauen auf der Teppichetage, bessere Jobsharing-Modelle und mehr Möglichkeiten zur Teilzeitarbeit. Das nationale Manifest zum Streik ist gewerkschaftlich geprägt. Es wurde an einer nationalen Streikversammlung in Biel verabschiedet und fordert unter anderem eine bessere Verteilung und Finanzierung der Arbeit im Haushalt und in der Familie, höhere Renten für Frauen und eine Reduktion der Arbeitszeit bei gleichbleibendem Lohn.

Wer hat den Frauenstreik organisiert?

Federführend waren regionale Komitees. Auf nationaler Ebene haben Gewerkschaften Kampagne gemacht. Der ursprüngliche Streikaufruf kam von Feministinnen aus der Romandie, und zwar schon Anfang 2018. Im Herbst 2018 sprang der Schweizerische Gewerkschaftsbund (SGB) auf, später auch die Katholikinnen, die Bäuerinnen und Frauen aus bürgerlichen Parteien und der Wirtschaft. Letztere teilten vor einer Woche per Communiqué mit, dass sie die Arbeitsverweigerung als Protestform verneinen, die anderen Aktionen vom 14. Juni aber unterstützen.

Wie reagiert die Wirtschaft auf den Frauenstreiktag?

Der Schweizerische Arbeitgeberverband (SAV) weist darauf hin, dass in vielen Gesamtarbeitsverträgen die «absolute Friedenspflicht» vereinbart sei. Damit sei jegliche «Kampfmassnahme» ausgeschlossen. Der Verband empfiehlt den Arbeitnehmerinnen, einen Tag frei zu nehmen oder Überzeit zu kompensieren, wenn sie am Frauentag teilnehmen wollen. Die Migros gab dieselbe Direktive raus. Ikea Schweiz hat mitgeteilt, man unterstütze die Frauen mit einer «flexiblen Arbeitsplanung». Die Credit Suisse erlaubt das Fernbleiben am Frauentag – vorausgesetzt, dass keine dringenden beruflichen Tätigkeiten vernachlässigt würden. Die SBB bieten den Mitarbeiterinnen für die Teilnahme an Kundgebungen (während der Freizeit) oder zur Solidarisierung bei der Arbeit sogar ein SBB-Shirt an. Die Fluggesellschaft Swiss hingegen verbietet den Mitarbeiterinnen explizit, während der Arbeitszeit zu demonstrieren.

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