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Survey: The Minnesota rules on staying at home



More than two-thirds of Minnesotans say they will not return to normal rhythms in daily life, although some social distance restrictions have been relaxed, and many believe the worst of the coronavirus pandemic is yet to come, according to a new Star Tribune / MPR News / KARE 11 survey.

As the anxiety for the virus persists, the study also found that a majority of people support restrictions on home and business closures for two months, saying they were necessary to limit the spread of the virus in their communities.

In the survey of 800 registered voters – conducted May 18 to May 20 – 57% of those surveyed said the restrictions are the right approach to preventing the corona virus spread, while 32% said they have gone too far. Only 9% said the restrictions did not go far enough. Despite partisan divisions, a majority of independents also support the restrictions.

“The rest of them can do whatever they want, but I try to protect myself,”

; said Gary Lenius, who lives in Two Ports and supports the restrictions because he is 78 and is at higher risk of serious illness if he catches the virus. Plus, he said, staying at home already fits his lifestyle. “I’m not going to go out and run around, I’ll play it gently and wait and see and take my time. The rocking chair fits quite well at this time. “

The Mason-Dixon survey, which has a 3.5% margin of error, comes when GFL government Tim Walz slowly starts to turn the wheel on a “home-order” that stopped non-critical companies for 51 days and asked Minnesotans to stay inside with the exception for essential needs and services. That order was raised on Monday and replaced with a new measure that allows Main Street businesses and retailers to open their doors, while still limiting group gatherings to a maximum of ten people.

Under a separate order, bars and restaurants in the state have been closed for dinners since March 17, as have cinemas, gyms, hairdressers, concert venues and other public spaces that put people in close contact. As of June 1, Walz said restaurants and bars can start serving up to 50 patrons outdoors, and hair salons and barbershops can open again with 25% capacity, as long as employees and customers wear masks.

Support for Walz’s restrictions is higher among women, people living in Hennepin and Ramsey counties, and those who identify as Democrats. But strong support for the restrictions was found in the state, not just in urban areas. A majority of independents also support the restrictions, with 60% saying they are right or not going far enough, compared with 37% saying they have gone too far.

Across the country, 65% of Republicans say the restrictions have gone too far. Walz’s orders have also come under heavy attack from conservative groups and GOP legislators in the Minnesota Legislature, who claim they have been applied unevenly and will lead to a devastating economic downturn. Since March, approximately 700,000 Minnesotans have applied for unemployment benefits.

Mark Peterson, who has owned a car repair company for more than 30 years, said he has been affected by people driving less and staying close to home during the crisis. He said Walz’s restrictions have gone “too far.”

“I just have a hard time believing that the government can tell a small business not to be open, and that’s their livelihood,” Peterson said. “If someone told me I couldn’t open my door or couldn’t do what I put my whole life in, I would be really upset about it and fight it.”

He was one of the 36% of Minnesota people who say they’ve had someone in their household lose a job or income because of the pandemic. The financial fee seemed to be spread fairly evenly across the state, with about 50% of people in all regions saying no one in their homes had lost income. The rest had no workers in the house.

Peterson, who splits his time between Cohasset and Owatonna, said closing stores is what keeps him from going out right now, not health problems. However, given the recent COVID-19 outbreak at the Viracon glass factory in Owatonna, he said he would be more cautious in that area. But when he is in rural Cohasset, near Grand Rapids, he has not felt a need to change his lifestyle that much.

“I come from a smaller community where I don’t feel I have to worry as badly. Maybe if I was in the middle of a big city I would have a different thought, ”Peterson said. He also said he could be more careful if he was often around the elderly or people with health complications.

Peterson is part of 29% of respondents who said they will resume their normal operations when restrictions are lifted. But a third of respondents said they will continue to limit how much they spend. Another 27% said their movements will be “very limited” and 11% said they will continue to protect inside until there is a vaccine or the risk of the virus disappears.

Several people who were asked – 42% – believe that the worst of the pandemic is yet to come, as the number of laboratory-confirmed cases continues to increase and Minnesota has seen new heights for the total number of deaths in one day. Thirty percent of respondents said the virus is not a problem in their community, while 16% said the state is experiencing the worst of the pandemic now.

COVID-19 has appeared in almost all Minnesota counties, but according to the Minnesota Department of Health data, some counties have a higher concentration of cases. State officials have warned that they expect the state to hit a COVID-19 summit sometime in July, with a possible second wave of cases later this year.

“I get worried when I hear all these scientists talk about how bad the fall and winter are going to be,” said Elaina Buzzell, who lives in Minneapolis. “I would love for this to be over, I would love to get cured and we can do it with this. I don’t know anyone who doesn’t want it and I hope it works, she said. “To know how much a regular seasonal flu can cause people, have it and [coronavirus] at the same time, it’s something I’m personally quite nervous about. “

However, only 10% of those surveyed said they were very worried about becoming seriously ill with COVID-19, with more than half saying they were not too worried or not worried at all. Among those living in greater Minnesota, only 5% or fewer are very worried about becoming seriously ill.

A little more than a third of those surveyed said they know someone who has tested positive for the virus, with people living in Hennepin and Ramsey counties somewhat more likely to know someone who has been infected.

As with support for Walz’s limitations, women were more likely to be concerned about becoming ill. And fear of the disease seems strongly divided along the partisans.

While 22% of Democrats said they are very worried about getting a serious case of COVID-19, less than 1% of Republicans expressed the same level of concern. Among Republicans, 82% said they were not too worried about being serious or not worried at all.

While health experts say the elderly are most exposed to COVID-19, nearly two-thirds of study groups aged 18 to 34 support restrictions on staying at home.

Sergio Salgado, a 26-year-old from Mankato who works at a private college, said he is not worried about getting sick from the virus. But even with relaxed rules, he said he plans to stay there to protect those who are more vulnerable.

“I’m a young millennial. I’m not susceptible to it, he said. “But it would be incredibly selfish for me to at least not protect those around me who may be autoimmune compromised and susceptible to the disease.”

Briana Bierschbach • 651-925-5042

Jessie Van Berkel • 651-925-5044

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