Home / Science / Stone used as a doorstep for the last 30 years is meteorite worth $ 100K

Stone used as a doorstep for the last 30 years is meteorite worth $ 100K



A 22-pound stone that has tipped opens a door in Michigan for decades proves to be a meteorite valued at $ 100,000 according to Central Michigan University.

Mona Sirbescu, a CMU geology professor, is constantly being asked by people to investigate the rocks they bring with her, but nobody turns out to be an official space rock.

"For 18 years, the answer has been categorically no, meteoric failure, not meteorites," said Sibescu in a statement from CMU on Thursday.

Everything changed when she was asked to investigate an odd shaped large rock that a Michigan man, who would not be named, had had in his possession for the past 30 years.

"I could tell you that this was something special," said Sibescu.

After testing, she determined that it was a meteorite made of 88.5 percent iron and 1

1.5 percent nickel. This is not just a space rock. Weighing at 22 pounds, it's the sixth largest recorded find in Michigan, and potentially worth $ 100,000 according to the university.

"This is the most valuable example I've ever stayed in my life, monetary and scientific," said Sibescu

. For double verification, part of it was sent to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, validating that it actually was a meteorite, according to the press release.

Journey to Earth

The rock arrived sometime in the 1930s, according to its owner, who received it in 1988 when he bought a farm in Edmore about 30 miles southwest of Mount Pleasant . While the property was being spanned, the man saw the man that it was a door and asked the farmer what it was.

The farmer told him that it was a meteorite that it was part of the property and he could get it.

The farmer said it had come down to the property in the 1930s, "and it made a shot of a noise when it hit," the new owner reminded him to say, according to CMU's statement. In the morning, the farmer and his father found the crater and dug the still-life meteorite.

The new owner lived on the farm for a few years, and when he moved, he took the mystery rocket with him. For the past 30 years, he has used himself as a doorway and sent it to school with his children for show-and-tell.

The man was inspired this year by stories about Michigan residents to find and sell pieces of meteorites.

"I said," Wait a minute. I wonder how much my worth is.

From the doorstep to show

Now the spacebar, dubbed Edmore meteorite, is waiting to find a permanent home.

"What usually happens to these at this time is that the meteorites can either be sold and displayed in a museum or sold to collectors and sellers who want to make a profit," said Sirbescu.

Smithsonian and a mineral museum in Maine are considering buying the meteorite for display, according to CMU. If a sale goes through, the man has agreed to give 10 percent of the sales value to the university for studies of soil and atmospheric science.

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