Home / US / Seattle City Council approves the plan to defeat the police department, cut jobs and salaries

Seattle City Council approves the plan to defeat the police department, cut jobs and salaries



The Seattle City Council voted Monday to move forward with a controversial proposal that would begin the process of firing the police department.

The 7-1 vote comes despite objections from the city’s police chief, mayor and the Seattle Police Officers Guild.

The plan would ultimately reduce funding for the department but not the 50% that some had applied for. Seattle currently has about 1,400 police officers, and the current plan would see about 100.

Councilwoman Kshama Sawant was the only “no” vote because she felt the proposals did not go far enough, while Debora Juarez abstained, according to MyNorthWest.com.

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The council reviewed a final set of amendments Monday before the vote, which included reducing the police department by up to 1

00 officials through layoffs and exhaustion and reducing the annual salary of $ 285,000 to Police Chief Carmen Bästa and other top executives. Best is the city’s first black police chief and the pay cut would put her salary far below her white predecessor.

The council’s plan also removes officers from a team dismantling homeless camps.

The transition to defeating the city’s navigation team and redirecting money to homeless outreach services like REACH will “dramatically limit the city’s ability to deal with unauthorized camps,” Jason Johnson, interim director of Seattle’s Department of Human Services, wrote in a letter to council last week.

Some councilors have said the initial cuts are a first step towards more comprehensive reductions and a reconsideration of law enforcement in Seattle.

“It is important to show the members of society that we hear them, that we are working towards the same goal,” said Councilwoman Teresa Mosqueda last week.

Mayor Jenny Durkan and Best have called on the council to slow down their discussions on police budgets and say the issue can be taken seriously when the 2021 city budget is considered. They also claimed that any redundancies would be disproportionate to newer officers, often hired from minority communities and would inevitably lead to trials.

MEMBERS OF THE REGULAR COUNCIL reveal the plan to lay out coups but balm when depositing the department with 50 percent the right way

Durkan has already focused on about $ 20 million in savings from the police budget this year, largely due to spending on reduced revenues due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last month, the mayor outlined a plan to reduce the police budget by about $ 75 million next year by transferring parking attendants, 911 call centers and other areas from the department.

As the U.S. attorney in Seattle, Durkan previously pushed for an investigation by the Justice Department that found officers were too quick to use force, leading to a 2012 decree with the federal government. Audits by an independent supervisor have established that the changes under the consent decree have led to the number of police officers using force. But critics have said that the department’s actions during recent protests show that not enough progress has been made.

Reducing funding for police departments has been announced by protesters in Seattle and other cities around the country following George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis. In that case, a white police officer knelt on the back of Floyd’s neck for several minutes until he died. Floyd was black.

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Protests, some of which began peacefully but became violent, were reported across the country, including in Portland and St. Louis. Louis.

On Sunday night, vandals in Seattle targeted several stores in the city’s First Hill neighborhood and broke glass doors at a Chase Bank and Key Bank branch. Vandals also targeted a built-in Starbucks and several other companies in the area, local media reported.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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