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Qatar is so hot that the capital now has outdoor air conditioning



Qatar is so hot that the capital now has air conditioning OUTSIDE to protect people from summer temperatures hovering to a windy 115 ° F.

  • Doha now has air conditioning units in its markets and shopping malls outdoors
  • The authorities have also painted a road blue to try to stop asphalt heating
  • One expert said that pollution contributes to rising heat in the Gulf States

One of the hottest countries on earth installs air conditioning outdoors and paints roads blue in an attempt to stay cool.

The temperature in the summer now reaches a starving 46 ° C (46 ° C) in Qatar, where the 2022 World Cup has already been moved to winter to avoid burning heat.

Last year, the small Gulf State began with air conditioning in its football arenas to keep fans and players cool.

But now gigantic coolers have been installed next to sidewalks and in outdoor shopping malls so that the temperature is bearable for people walking in their everyday lives.

And in Doha, the nation's capital, the Public Works Authority has painted Abdullah Bin Jassim Street near one of the city's largest souks markets the color blue to lower the temperature of asphalt by 59-68 ° F.

  Roads in Qatar's capital, Doha , painted blue because the color absorbs less heat th a black asphalt so that the surface stays cooler longer

Qatar's capital, Doha, has painted blue because the color absorbs less heat than black asphalt so the surface stays cooler longer

  Cold air is pumped into stadiums at the 2022 Soccer World Cup, which will be held in Gulf State, via large cooling nozzles connected to cooled water

K all air will be pumped into stadiums at the 2022 Soccer World Cup, which will be held in Gulf State, via large cooling nozzles connected to chilled water

The blue roads help lower the temperature as dark colored roads absorb the heat from the sun

The 18-month-long experiment is on a 650-meter stretch of road and uses a 0.003 inch (1 mm) thick blue coating with a special heat reflective pigment.

It also contains hollow ceramic microspheres designed to reflect infrared radiation.

Engineer Saad Al-Dosari said: "The temperature of dark asphalt is 20 degrees higher than the actual temperature because black attracts and radiates heat".

Other cities around the world have also conducted similar experiments to deal with the extreme heat.

This summer, Los Angeles painted its streets in a gray-white coating that may be 23 ° F colder than the black surface.

  The Blue Roads is an 18 month long experiment on a 650 foot long stretch of road now covered with a 0.003 inch (1 mm) thick blue coating with a special heat reflective pigment. It also contains hollow ceramic microspheres designed to reflect infrared radiation

The Blue Roads is an 18-month experiment on a 650-foot-long stretch now covered with a 0.003 inch (1 mm) blue coating with a especially heat reflecting pigments. It also contains hollow ceramic microspheres designed to reflect infrared radiation

  Doha (pictured) is so warm in part because it is located on a peninsula in the Persian Gulf, where surface water temperatures average about 32.3 ° C - the temperature in the city can reach a sweltering 115 ° F (46 ° C)

Doha (pictured) is so hot, partly because it is located on a peninsula in the Gulf of Persia, where surface water temperatures average 90, 3 ° F (32.4 ° C) – the temperature in the city can reach a starving temperature of 46 ° C

  Engineer Saad Al-Dosari said: & # 39; The temperature of dark asphalt is 20 degrees higher than the actual temperature because black attracts and radiates heat & # 39;

Engineer Saad Al-Dosari said: "The temperature of dark asphalt is 20 degrees higher than the actual temperature because black attracts and radiates heat.

The air conditioning in Qatar works by pumping cold air onto the sidewalk through cooling nozzles after

Qatar is particularly sensitive to extreme heat because the country is a peninsula – a piece of land that protrudes into water – at the Persian Gulf.

In the bay, the average surface temperature of water about 90.3 ° F (32.4 ° C).

With virtually no clouds or rain in the summer, rising sea temperatures lead to more humidity.

Jos Lelieveld, an atmospheric chemist at the Max Planck Institute in Germany , said: & # 39; These areas are heating faster than the rest of the world, and in some cities on top you have an urban heat island effect and urban pollution. "

In an effort to help everyone keep s ig cool, city planners have built walkways and streets pointing north to take advantage of winds coming from that direction.

Talking about the blue path Hossam Almeer, a 30-year computer scientist working for the Qatar Computing Research Institute (QCRI), said: "I think it is amazing that the government is open to using technological innovation to address the challenges of live in the desert.

"The degree of cooling can have a real impact on our electricity consumption because air conditioning accounts for almost 70 percent of household electricity use."

SEPTEMBER 2019 WAS THE COMMON HOTTEST ANYONE

Scientists say the globe is hottest temperatures ever for September, along with 2015, as a sweaty US saw its hottest September on record.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says 2019 is bound for 2015 for the hottest September on record worldwide.

September was on average 60.71 ° F (15.95 ° C), at 1.71 ° F (0.95 ° C) higher than the 20th century average.

nd was the hottest on the record for September, with records dating back to 1880.

NOAA calculates that the earth is in pace for the second hottest year on record, behind 2016.

  This image provided by NOAA shows a global map indicating temperature deviations from the average in September 2019. On Wednesday, October 16, 2019, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said 2019 tied with 2015 for the hottest September on record globally. September averaged 60.71 degrees (15.95 Celsius), 1.71 degrees (0.95 Celsius) higher than the 20th century average. (NOAA-NCEI via AP)

This image provided by NOAA shows a global map indicating temperature deviations from the average in September 2019. On Wednesday, October 16, 2019, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 2019 said tied to 2015 for the hottest September in the world. September averaged 60.71 degrees (15.95 Celsius), 1.71 degrees (0.95 Celsius) higher than the 20th century average. (NOAA-NCEI via AP)

NOAA Climate Monitoring Director Deke Arndt says that everything except the western third of the US was record or near record warm this month.

Mr. Arndt says this is heating up that has been going on for decades from heat trapping gases from the burning of fossil fuels.

Twenty countries around the world experienced their hottest temperatures on record between May and August this year.

A total of 396 heat items were broken in the Northern Hemisphere with Germany, France and the Netherlands experiencing most days of record heat.

Figures from climate experts at Berkeley Earth in California found that monthly elevations were recorded in 1,200 separate cases north of the equator.

Experts blame saying that global warming is to blame for the hot spells and that record breaking temperatures are becoming more common.

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