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Crysis Remastered Review – Gamereactor



Crysis struck like a bomb thirteen years ago. Crytek’s explosive sandbox stands as one of the largest and most remarkable steps taken for game graphics throughout history. The gaming industry has hardly seen much hope either before or since, and the phrase “But can it run Crysis?” has long established itself as an established buzzword. We all know the faint story of four well-equipped special forces tasked with exploring and neutralizing a terrorist threat on an island in the South Pacific, which quickly turns out to be a real nightmare when a bunch of aliens decide to throw themselves away. . For me, Crysis was one of the most impressive games I had played when it came thirteen years ago, and it was not just because of the amazing graphics. The freedom and opportunities that the open landscape the gaming world had to offer were much more enticing than I could have imagined in advance. Tailoring your own style of play based on the various features of Nomad̵

7;s nano suit made Crysis changeable and open in a way you rarely saw in action games in 2007, at least outside of cities like Liberty City or San Andreas.

Crysis Remastered

Crytek, which debuted on the gaming front with Far Cry, sold the license for the later game series to Ubisoft, and with the revenue, they shook the entire gaming industry with what was undoubtedly the world’s most beautiful game at the time. On one of my many visits to Frankfurt’s headquarters, the founder and head of the studio, Cevat Yerli, told how they had deliberately created a game that would only be possible to play on Ultra at 60 frames per second five years (!) After launch.

Crysis Remastered

Thirteen years have passed, and now a fragmented and almost bankrupt Crytek has launched the same game again in “remaster” format. Crysis now runs on CryEngine 5 and comes with built-in support for beam tracking and other new features. I have looked quickly at the PC version, but first and foremost I have spent time with Crysis Remastered on a PS4 Pro, where it becomes very clear that it is misleading to call this a remaster. That is not the case. This is a simple and easy conversion of the same old game to a new console format.

Crysis Remastered

When all settings are maximized in the PC version, you will see some small light effects that look a little better than in the original. The differences are still extremely small, and on PS4 or Xbox One X it looks like the same game that was launched in the fall of 2007. Much has been said about how hardware-based beam tracking will help Crysis Remastered have reflections that few other modern games can flash, but unfortunately can I do not agree with that. Of course, it is possible to see how small and insignificant individual components of the gaming world are reflected on certain surfaces, but there are such small differences compared to the original that I struggle to understand why they have chosen to call this a “Remaster” at all. As for the differences between the different console versions, the Xbox One X runs the game with a slightly higher resolution (2160p versus 1080p) without an upper limit on the number of frames per second. With beam tracking turned on, however, both versions drop to 1080p with a locked frame rate of 30 frames per second. Not impressive, although “beam tracking on consoles” sounded very promising when the game was first announced.

Crysis Remastered

On the other hand, Crysis is still fun. It’s quite addictive when it comes to how many different ways you can attack enemies. Here, only the player’s imagination sets limits. The result is that the variation becomes one of the best parts of Crysis (something that both sequels lacked), and the control system is also improved in the console versions. Saber Interactive has had enough feel to implement the control system from Crysis 2 on PS3 and Xbox 360, which means that the nanoduct’s various functions are set to different buttons rather than the damn wheel that the original had on the computer. It was something here already in 2007, and it’s good to see that you now have a better system that does not require you to choose the right nanofunction while you are being pushed from all directions. Of course, some parts of the game feel a bit outdated, but for the most part I have fun throughout the game. However, the last part of the game where the sunny paradise freezes over is a little different. The enemies are still as hyper-smart and extremely accurate as they always have been. Thus, it becomes extremely frustrating how easily enemy soldiers can beat Nomad at a distance of 200 meters even though I crawl through the grass like a superior nano-ninja. The weapons lack the little extra, and the story presented in the film sequences is still as bad as it always has been.

Crysis Remastered

Crysis Remastered is not a remaster with clearly improved graphics and sound, but rather a traditional conversion of a thirteen year old action game. However, this does not mean that Crysis does not maintain, because it does.




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