Home / Science / New spacecraft will lead to binary asteroid

New spacecraft will lead to binary asteroid



<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = " From Popular Mechanics "Data Reaction =" 22 "> From Popular Mechanics

The solar system is full of giant asteroids moving around, and although space is large and usually empty, there is a decent chance that some of these asteroids are on a collision course with the earth. If a sufficiently large asteroid hits the ground in the right place, it can wipe out millions of people, why it's so important to learn to prevent asteroid affect.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1

.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "In the next decade, both NASA and European Space Organization (ESA) NASA will launch its DART probe in 2022 which will crash into a nearby asteroid in an attempt to change its path. And in 2026, ESA begins its own probe to study the results of impact up close to . "NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) will take the first steps towards a defensive plan against asteroids in the next decade. NASA will launch its DART probe in 2022, which will crash into a nearby asteroid in an attempt to change its path. And in 2026, ESA begins its own probe to study the results of the effect close to each other.

ESA's Hera probe will be launched to a binary pair of asteroids that regularly cross the earth. This binary pair consists of a large asteroid, called Didymos, and a smaller asteroid, called Didymoon. About 25 percent of the asteroids in the solar system are binary pairs like Didymos and its companions, but no one has ever been visited by a spacecraft before.

When Hera arrives at these asteroids, they will already have been changed by DART's influence in 2022. As part of his mission, Hera will study the battlefields and the asteroid's changes. In addition, Hera will map the smaller of the two asteroids in detail using lidar technology.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt) – sm" type = "text" content = "The goal is to pioneer several new methods to map asteroids, because some of the traditional methods do not work in a binary system. For example, ESA's former spacecraft from Rosetta visited a comedian named 67P / Churyumov-Gerasimenko and measured its mass by determining how the comet affected the spacecraft's path However, with a binary asteroid pair, this technique will not work because it becomes impossible to distinguish the effects of gravity by the two asteroids. "Data Reaction =" 27 "> The goal is to pioneer several new methods to map asteroids, as some of the Traditional methods do not work in a binary system. For example, the ESA's former spacecraft in Rosetta visited a 67P / Churyumov-Gerasimenko name and measured its mass by determining how the comet affected the spacecraft's path. However, with a binary asteroid pair, this technique will not work because it becomes impossible to distinguish the gravity effects of the two asteroids.

Instead, Hera will see the larger of the two asteroids very close and pick out several distinctive landmarks and look at how these landmarks change in response to the second asteroid's gravity. With this new technology, future missions for binary asteroids will be very successful.

Hera will also carry two small CubeSats, which will be used to test different scientific instruments as well as new communication technologies. Hera will be commissioned to communicate with earth stations on earth and its smaller satellite comrades as a pioneer of potential future deep space missions.

All this means that Hera will benefit our understanding of binary asteroids along with promoting our planetary defense technology when working in deep space. It's a lot for a spacecraft to achieve, but it's almost clear task.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – Mt Mt (0.8em) -sm" type = "text" content = "Source: ESA "data-reactid =" 31 "> Source: ESA

<p class =" canvas-atom canvas text Mb) You may also like "data-reactid =" 32 "> You may also like


Source link