Home / World / Migrants from caravan give U.S. Ultimatum: Let them in or give them each $ 50,000

Migrants from caravan give U.S. Ultimatum: Let them in or give them each $ 50,000



Some migrants from the Caravan are demanding that the US government let them in or pay them each $ 50,000 to go home.

Migrants from Central America marched to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana in two groups, and one group of around 100, had a list of demands.

Other demands included having deportations halted, and to allow asylum seekers to be processed faster and in larger numbers according to the San Diego Union- Tribune.

The group also apparently expressed criticism of US intervention in Central America in a letter.

18 PHOTOS

A day in the life of the migrant caravan in Mexico

See Gallery

] Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, takes a rest on the road as she walks to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture Tasks October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, rests on the road with her son Adonai, as they make their way to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Disable Marcelino / File photo SEARCH "GLENDA ESCOBAR" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, plays with her son Adonai in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Uzès Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, sleeps in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Dismissed Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, poses for a photograph with her children Adonai and Denzel in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Dismissed Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, smiles as she rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Dismissed Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, poses with her son Denzel, 8, as they traveled in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Dismissed Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Uzès Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, rests on the road with her son Denzel as they walk to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Dismissed Marcelino TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Glenda Esc Obar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, prepares the sleeping place after arriving at a makeshift camp with her sons Adonai and Denzel, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28 , 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Denzel, 8, holds his brother Adonai, 5, near their mother Glenda Escobar, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States as they walk to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Uzès Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America and route to the United States, prepares the sleeping place after arriving at a makeshift camp with her sons Adonai and Denzel, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Uzès Marcelino [19659021] Glenda Esc Obar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, cries after talking on the phone, in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Dismissed Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, rests on the road, on her way to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25 , 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, poses for a photograph as she rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico, October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Dismissed Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States , takes a ride in a vintage car with her ch ildren Adonai and Denzel, as they walk to Pijijiapan from Mapastepec, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25, 2018. REUTERS / Uzès Marcelino

Adonai, 5, son of Glenda Escobar, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, smiles as he rests in San Pedro Tapanatepec, Mexico October 28, 2018. Picture taken October 28, 2018. REUTERS / Dismissed Marcelino

Glenda Escobar, 33, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan or thousands from Central America and route to the United States, prepares the sleeping place after arriving at a makeshift camp with her children Adonai and Denzel, in Pijijiapan, Mexico, October 25, 2018. Picture taken October 25 , 2018. REUTERS / Dispute Marcelino




HIDE CAPTION

SHOW CAPTION

Right now, Newsweek reports asylum officers are considering around 40 to 100 claims per day.

The second group of around only 50 migrants asked for the asylum process to be Sped up to around 300 claims per day.

An organizer from Honduras told the paper, "It may seem like a lot of money to you … But it's a small sum compared to everything that the United States has stolen from Honduras. "

Fox News reports around 700 out of the 6,000 migrants who arrived in Tijuana have already returned home, while 300 have been deported.

While one Caravan member told officials that 2,500 have applied for humanitarian visas in Mexico, The Union Tribune reported that others have either crossed into the US


Source link