Home / Sports / Jim Schoenfeld: New York Rangers Senior Vice President and Assistant GM Steps Down after 17 Seasons with Organization

Jim Schoenfeld: New York Rangers Senior Vice President and Assistant GM Steps Down after 17 Seasons with Organization



Senior Vice President and Deputy Chef Jim Schoenfeld has gone down from his position with the team.

This is not so surprising, as it comes weeks after Glen Sather took his role as law president. Schoenfeld worked close to Sather, and he had a number of positions after joining the organization after serving as leading analyst for ESPN's National Hockey Night 1999 to 2002.

From his bio on the team's press release:

was Schoenfeld a member of the Rangers organization for 17 seasons (2002-03 – 2018-19), who goes back to when he was appointed assistant coach with Blueshirts on June 12, 2002. During his service in the Rangers organization, he served in several capacities, including Assistant coach with Rangers, Rangers Assistant General Manager, General Manager of the Rangers American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate (either Hartford Wolf Pack or Connecticut Whale) and Wolf Packs Head Coach. He served eight seasons as Rangers Assistant General Manager, Player Personnel before being promoted to Senior Vice President and Assistant General Manager on July 1, 2015.

Schoenfeld served 14 seasons as General Manager of the Wolf Pack / Whale (2003-04 – 2016-17), and he served as the team's principal leader for two seasons (2005-06 and 2006-07). He played an important role in developing the organization's perspective potential, as several Rangers were developed during his AHL guidance before becoming key players in New York.

Schoenfeld also served as Rangers' head coach for Game Six in the 2009 Eastern Conference Quarterfinals when John Tortorella was interrupted to throw a water bottle into a fan.

This move is probably a signal that Rangers are approaching to announce their next team president – expected to be John Davidson – and they clear the way for him to install his own people.


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