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ICU deaths from COVID-19 may decrease, the study suggests



novel coronavirus continues to increase in many states around the country, new data provide some encouraging details. ONE recent study suggests that for persons admitted to intensive care units for severe COVID-19 infection, the death rate has dropped by about a third since the pandemic began. “data-reactid =” 17 “> As cases of the new coronavirus continue to increase in many states around the country, new data provide encouraging A new study suggests that the death rate has dropped by about a third since the pandemic began for people who are admitted to intensive care units for severe COVID-19 infection.

Shortly after the first patients with the virus were identified in December, the number of positive cases increased exponentially – but now we have an understanding of strategies to mitigate virus spread and therapies for treating patients.

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The study, conducted by researchers in the UK and published in the journal Anesthesia, offers a hopeful message to front-line workers who actively care for critically ill patients. The authors systematically reviewed and performed a meta-analysis of all studies looking at ICU deaths of adult patients around the world adopted with COVID-19. The mortality rate for these patients in May was about 40%, a decrease from almost 60% at the end of March.

result in ICU admissions. “data-reactid =” 22 “> Over the past seven months, researchers around the world have coordinated efforts to try to find a way to cure the disease. Our knowledge of how the virus spreads, blocks its host and causes infection has increased enormous, and so has our understanding of dealing with serious complications that often result in ICU assumptions.

PHOTO: Registered respiratory therapist Niticia Mpanga enters a COVID patient room at the ICU at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas, on July 15, 2020. (Mark Felix / AFP via Getty Images)

“I think we are much better now,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior researcher at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security, who is board certified in critical care and infectious diseases. “We have a better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, we have better tools to improve patient care and we are more knowledgeable about ventilator management in these patients.”

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admitted to the ICU. But in addition to better treatment, other factors may have played a role in improving survival. “Data-reactid =” 36 “> Recently, studies looking at critically ill coronavirus patients have shown the potential importance of using steroids and antivirals in ICU patients, but in addition to better treatment, other factors may have played a role in: improve survival.

“We diagnose people earlier,” said Dr. Adalja. Technological advances in testing and increased awareness to test all coronavirus symptomatic individuals have led to earlier diagnosis and faster treatment.

And although tools for testing for the virus, recommended methods for preventing virus spread, and strategies for restricting large gatherings differed between countries, the study found that there was no significant difference in the ICU death rate across continents.

PHOTO: Registered respiratory therapist Niticia Mpanga reviews patient information in ICU at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas, July 15, 2020. (Mark Felix / AFP via Getty Images)

“The global amount of knowledge that has given rise to this problem is what has helped reduce mortality,” said Dr.

Still, Dr. warns Pena that successful treatment must be “combined with good public health measures.” If not, we will “erase all gains made in recent months by simply swapping out ICUs that have just gotten better at treating COVID-19,” he said.

This feeling is repeated by Dr. Adalja, who warns that the study should not “be considered that the virus is less deadly, only that we get better.”

And this warning should not be taken lightly. Reports of ventilator shortages in major US cities were largely the result of a higher proportion of the population being infected by the virus, leading to increased hospitalization. Continuation of social distance, hand washing and mask wearing are crucial to reduce the spread.

“People are getting lower doses of viral vaccines” and “lower exposure” largely due to the strategies implemented to limit the spread, said Dr. Adalja. If fewer people become critically ill from the virus as a result of such measures, the ICU death rate may fall further as more new treatments continue to emerge.

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“Things that slipped through the cracks in the beginning” of the pandemic are no longer missing, said Dr. Adalja. “We should expect to see this trend continue.”

ICU deaths from COVID-19 may decrease, the study suggests originally appeared on abcnews.go.com“data-reactid =” 62 “>ICU deaths from COVID-19 may decrease, the study initially suggests abcnews.go.com


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