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Full Hunter's Moon to Rise this Weekend



If the sky is clear this weekend, you may be treated to the spectacular sight of an impressive full moon. Full Hunter's Moon will rise on Sunday just after sunset, and even though it is near the horizon, it will likely be much larger than usual. The effect is known as the illusion, which makes it appear closer to the horizon than when it is high in the sky. Many moons near the horizon also often appear red, orange or yellow as you look through more of the atmosphere when it is so low. As it rises, the moon will take on the characteristic silver-colored white color. As this time of year is near the ascent, the moon will rise at sunset and sit near the sunrise, so moonlighters can see it trace across the sky all night. The term "Hunter's Moon" is the name given to the first full moon after the harvest, which is the full moon wardrobe for the fall equilibrium. All clear nights in the days leading up to the full moon will be the perfect time to check out the first meteor showers in the fall. The Draconid meteor shower is active through Thursday evening, while the southern Taurids can be seen through Friday and into the weekend. The draconids usually do not produce many meteors, but unlike many meteor showers is the best time to watch them early in the evening. Later each night, the southern Taurids could display a screen. The bright moon will wash away weaker meteors, but southern Taurids tend to produce some bright fireballs, meteors much brighter than typical shooting stars. If the sky stays cloudy this week, don't worry. Later in the month you may be able to watch the Orionid meteor shower, which peaks in the morning of October 22. These fast, weak meteors are caused by debris from Halley's Comet, and the shower usually produces 1

0 to 20 meteors per hour.

If the sky is clear this weekend, you may be treated to the spectacular sight of an impressive full moon.

The full Hunter's Moon will rise on Sunday just after sunset, and while it is near the horizon, it will likely emerge much larger than usual. The effect is known as the illusion, which makes it appear closer to the horizon than when it is high in the sky.

Full moons near the horizon also often appear red, orange or yellow as you look through more of the atmosphere when it is so low. As it rises, the moon will take on the distinctive silver-colored white color.

As this time of year is near the ascent, the moon will rise at sunset and lie near the sunrise, so moonlighters can see it trace across the sky all night.

The term "Hunter's Moon" is the name given to the first full moon after Harvest Moon, which is the full moon wardrobe for the fall equilibrium.

All clear nights in the days leading up to the full moon will be the perfect time to check out the first meteor showers in the fall. The Draconid meteor shower is active through Thursday evening, while the southern Taurids can be seen through Friday and into the weekend.

The draconids usually do not produce many meteors, but unlike many meteor showers is the best time to watch them early in the evening.

Later each night, the southern Taurids could lay on a screen. The bright moon will wash away weaker meteors, but southern Taurids tend to produce some bright fireballs, meteors much brighter than typical shooting stars.

If the sky remains cloudy this week, don't worry. Later in the month you may be able to watch the Orionid meteor shower, which peaks in the morning of October 22. These fast, weak meteors are caused by debris from Halley's Comet, and the shower usually produces 10 to 20 meteors per hour.


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