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Father notices sun stain on the neck before doctors are forced to remove a massive piece of skin



A father who had a huge bite in his neck that went off to remove a deadly melanoma has issued a warning to all sun seekers.

Ryan Glossop, 37, made the potentially life-saving decision to have his skin checked last November after a friend tragically died of skin cancer.

What began as a small mole on the back of Perth's father's neck was diagnosed as a form of cancer.

Two surgeries later, Mr. Glossop's results were still abnormal.

  Ryan Glossop (pictured with his wife Fallon), 37, made the life-changing decision to have his skin checked last November after a friend of a friend tragically died of skin cancer

Ryan Glossop (pictured with his wife Fallon), 37, made life-changing decisions to get skin checked in N oember last year after a friend of a friend tragically died of skin cancer

  What started as a small mole on the back of Perth dad's neck (image) ended up in cancer

What started out as a small mole on the back of Perth dad's neck (picture) ended up in cancer

His wife Fallon Glassop took to social media to explain her family's examination.

"The thing is that not only does skin cancer remove the affected skin area, but they also take a border around it," she wrote.

"Ryan's borders continued to come back abnormal, which was then found to be a skin condition called Nevus Spillus. It is very rare for it to turn into melanoma, but in his case it did."

Mom-off – two went on to describe the heartache her husband underwent, with details of 40 neck, spine and lung biopsies and four painful surgeries.

In May of this year, the final surgery involved the removal of a large strip of skin from the man's neck and legs.

"A large skin area from the neck and back needed to be taken … Ryan had a skin graft, which removes the skin from both legs to cover the section of the neck and back, she said.

  Two mothers went on to describe the heartache that her husband underwent four painful surgeries (image: the scar after one of Mr. Glossop's operations

  In May this year, the final surgery involved the removal of a large strip of skin from the man's neck (image) and bone

In May this year in The final surgery involved the removal of a large strip of skin from the man's neck (image) and legs

The piece of skin was 8 cm wide and 40 cm long, Yahoo reported.

Mr. Glossop described the "scary" ordeal.

"Going through it was scary at first, but once they said" if we can get this skin graft done, we think you will be done ", it was more about the fact that I should have significant scars. "

The keen basketball player also acknowledged that he never thought he was in danger because he does not have many freckles as a child.

"In recent years, things have started to change, I got more spots and more freckles, but it wasn't until I entered the mining industry for work that the concept of skin checks was thrown around quite a bit."

Mr. Glossop said that he wanted to share his experience to warn people of misconceptions about m elanoma.

  Mr. Glossop (pictured) said he wanted to share his experience to warn people about melanoma misconceptions

Glossop (pictured) said he wanted to share his experience to warn people of misconceptions about melanoma

  Mr. and Mrs. Glossops (pictured) two young children, eight and five, undergoing screening to find out if their lives are coming to be affected by the disease

Mr and Mrs Glossops (pictured) two young children, eight and five years, undergo screenings to find out if their lives will be affected by the disease

He said most people think cancer freckles can be deadly, but are removed quite easily and o Leave the bar a little scar.

Sharing graphic images of his speckled neck on social media was an attempt to show people how disastrous the condition can be.

His two young children, aged eight and five, undergo screenings to find out if their lives will be affected by the disease.

"Have a skin check!" he invited Facebook users.

This whole experience has been incredibly challenging for all of us, but if something good is to come out of it, it is that we now want to help raise awareness about skin cancer, "wrote Ms. Glassop

" Melanoma stands for 10 percent of all skin cancers, which is why it's so important that everyone has regular skin checks. "

WHAT IS MELANOMA?

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that usually occurs on the parts of the body that have been overexposed to the sun.

Melanoma is the third most common cancer diagnosed in Australia, which together with New Zealand has the world's highest incidence of melanoma.

Melanoma is more commonly diagnosed in men than women.

In 2015, 13,694 new cases of melanoma were diagnosed in Australia, accounting for nearly one in ten cancer diagnoses.

Often, melanoma has no symptoms, but the first sign is generally a change in an existing mole or the appearance of a new place. These changes may include:

Color: a mole can change in color or have different shades of color or become mottled.

Size: a mole may seem larger.

Form: a mole may have an irregular boundary or may increase in height.

Height: the mole can develop a high area of ​​itching or bleeding.

Source: Cancer Council


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