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Fake News: 12,000 doctors NOT only asked the FDA to put cancer warnings on cheese



Requested 12,000 U.S. physicians Food and Drug Administration to put cancer warnings on cheese? No, that's not true: The vegan advocacy group The Medical Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) filed a petition in which the FDA warns on a cheese package that "dairy cheese contains reproductive hormones that can increase the risk of breast cancer mortality." While the group claims to represent 12,000 doctors, only one doctor signed the document. It is estimated that less than 5 percent of PCRM members are physicians.

The story originated in an article published by LiveKindly.co on October 8, 2019 entitled "12,000 Doctors Who Just Requested the FDA to Put Cancer Warnings on Cheese" (Filed Here) Opening:

Doctors Preparing the FDA to Add health warnings on cheese products. Studies have linked dairy consumption with a higher risk of breast cancer.

The Medical Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) calls on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to place breast cancer warnings on cheese.
PCRM consisted of 1

2,000 medical professionals and wants cheese products to have warning labels similar to those on cigarette packages. It gives an example in the presentation: "dairy cheese contains reproductive hormones that can increase the risk of breast cancer mortality."

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Users on social media only saw this title, description and thumbnail image:

12,000 physicians only asked the FDA to put cancer warnings on cheese

Doctors manufacture FDA to put health warnings on cheese products Studies have linked dairy consumption with A higher risk of breast cancer.

Claiming that PCRM is a doctor's group is misleading The Newsweek newspaper reported in 2004 that "less than 5 percent of PCRM's members are doctors." The group has also been accused of being a front for animal rights p People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

The Medical Committee for Responsible Medicine dicin (PCRM) is a wolf in sheep's clothing. PCRM is a fanatical animal rights group that seeks to remove eggs, milk, meat and seafood from the American diet and eliminate the use of animals in scientific research. Despite its operational and financial ties to other animal activist groups and its close relationship with violent zealots, PCRM has successfully dropped the media and a large portion of the public into believing that its statements about the superiority of vegetarian diets represent only the medical opinion community.

PCRM has not yet responded to Lead Story's request for comment. We will update this article when it does.

A more accurate headline would have been "The Vegan Advocacy Group urges the FDA to put cancer warnings on cheese."

The report correctly reports that PCRM's quote cites studies on diets in women who have survived breast cancer, but it does not show that research is unmatched on how much milk consumption increases cancer risk. Some of the studies cited actually found that dairy products can help reduce cancer risks, especially because of the benefits of Vitamin D. The Susan G. Komen website's page entitled "FERTILIZERS AND BREAST POWER RISKS" provides this analysis:

Some researchers have suggested that the high fat content of many dairy products or traces of growth hormones in milk can increase the risk of breast cancer. Others have investigated whether calcium and vitamin D in dairy products can lower the risk of breast cancer.

A composite analysis of data from more than 20 studies found no link between dairy product intake (including milk, cheese and yogurt) and breast cancer risk

But data from the Nurses & # 39; Health Study II found that women who Eating two or more servings of high fat milk products (like whole milk or butter) each day had a higher risk of breast cancer before menopause than women who ate fewer servings.

At present, eating or drinking dairy products is unlikely to be linked to the risk of breast cancer after menopause. However, more research is needed to draw firm conclusions about a possible link to the risk of breast cancer before menopause.

Read the full presentation of the PCRM to the FDA below:

2019 10 03 Medical Committee for Responsible Medicine FDA Petition Breast Cancer and Cheese FINAL by Alan Duke on Scribd

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