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Central American conference awards fall sports due to Coronavirus



Quarterback Greg Windham # 14 of the Ohio Bobcats slips past Dorance Armstrong Jr.  # 2 in the Kansas Jayhawks when he runs for a touchdown.

Quarterback Greg Windham # 14 of the Ohio Bobcats slips past Dorance Armstrong Jr. # 2 in the Kansas Jayhawks when he runs for a touchdown.
Photo: Ed Zurga (Getty Images)

Just days after UConn became the first major college football program to gracefully refrain from playing this season due to coronavirus, the Mid-American Conference – yes, an entire conference– will follow.

In a statement published on Twitter, the conference announced that it will postpone its football season until the spring semester of 2021 to preserve the health and safety of its student-athlete.

“This was not a simple decision but a decision we had to make in the best interests of our student-athletes, coaches and institutions,” said David Sayler, MAC Chairman of the Athletics Council and Miami Director of Athletics. said in a statement. “It is our responsibility to give our student-athletes an experience that allows them to participate at the highest level in the safest way. After consultation with our medical advisory panel, we considered that there were too many strangers surrounding the pandemic for us to be able to continue with the autumn season. “

A favorite among ESPN and CBS Sports viewers, #MACtion will surely be missed this fall. More importantly, this decision could persuade more powerful conferences like the Big Ten and Pac-12 to do the same, which would implode the entire NCAA landscape. And with Pac-12 presidents and chancellors meeting on Tuesday, according to for ESPN, a decision to pull the plug may be imminent.

“No one wanted to be the first to do that,” a Power 5 coach told ESPN, “and now no one will want to be the last.”

“It feels like no one wants to,” said a Power 5 administrator, “but it’s getting to the point where someone will need to.”

There is also this scary piece of information, courtesy of ESPN:

Sources said that team doctors around the sport notice cases of myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle caused by a viral infection, in college sports that have had COVID-19. College administrators last week saw Facebook post by Debbie Rucker, mother of Indiana offensive lineman Brady Feeney, who wrote that her son was still dealing with potential heart problems.

“What we do not know really haunted us, and that is why we came to our final decision,” [Northern Illinois athletic director Sean] In Frazier. “This is part of the information that our presidents used. This mom gave us a play-by-play. It’s very scary. “

Between this and All chaos going on in Major League Baseball, you would think the NFL would reconsider its plans to move on with its upcoming season, but it’s not. As funny as it sounds, the NFL actually looks capitalize on the potential absence of college football.

From ProFootballTalk:

According to a source with knowledge of the situation, the NFL is likely to move games from Sundays to Saturdays, if college football does not continue this season. It is unclear whether the games would be broadcast, streamed or distributed on a pay-per-view basis, but the league would likely refill the vacant Saturday windows with NFL content.

So yes, in the midst of a global pandemic that threatens the health and safety of millions of people, the NFL will throw out four football days a week: Thursday night football, Saturday, Sunday and Monday night football.

I can ‘t say I’m surprised, but I guess the NFL will keep an eye on college football’s doom like the rest of us. Expect some big announcements in the coming days.




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