Home / Technology / Interview with Juan Martín Maldacena: "I would like to get the Nobel for any future discovery"

Interview with Juan Martín Maldacena: "I would like to get the Nobel for any future discovery"



Of all the possible acknowledgments that flow in the circulation of theoretical physics, Argentine Juan Martín Maldacena practically harmed all . One of the few still missing in his exhibition is the Nobel. Considered to be one of the most innovative exponents of string theory (or theory M), no one is surprised when his name goes among the candidates. When asked why he would like to receive this award, he replied "to some discovery that he is making in the future" . He is currently a researcher at the Princeton Institute for Advanced Studies, the same facility where Albert Einstein worked for the last 21 years of his life.

This theorist, who was born in Caballito, visits the country, was awarded the honorary doctorate at the UBA's Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences and offered the students and experts in the issue a conference on black holes and quantum confusion. In the midst of an avalanche of long-range shakes and applause, a place was made in their agenda to talk to Clarín .

Because of its mixture of rigor and beauty, the M-theory has enough mathematical fuel to become the intended theory of everything (ToE). It is a hypothetical concept ̵

1; which has possessed physicists for 40 years – that would enable to unite the four basic forces of nature and to connect all known physical phenomena into a single formula .

  Juan Martín Maldacena. Argentine theoretical physicist. Professor and researcher at the Institute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, New Jersey. Juan Martin Maldacena physicist and teacher at the Institute for Advanced Study

Juan Martín Maldacena. Argentine theoretical physicist. Professor and researcher at the Institute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, New Jersey. Juan Martin Maldacena physicist and teacher at the Institute for Advanced Study

“String theory can describe how space-time behaves in a manner consistent with quantum mechanics. In other words, it is a theory that unites the two great revolutions of the twentieth century the quantum with general relativity, "warns Maldacena.

The shortcut he used to link these two reality visions was to imagine the universe as a hologram that in addition to the four known dimensions (length, width, depth and time) would consist of six additional dimensions ; most are compressed and are only labeled in microscopic scale .

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<img class = "img-responsive" alt = "The Argentine who knows most about the origin of the universe and works where Einstein taught" src = "https: //images.clarin. com / collections / static / lazy_square.svg "data-big =" https://images.clarin.com/2019/08/28/tiene-48-anos-y-trabaja___K6Kuobscg_290x290__1.jpg "data-small =" https: //images.clarin.com/2019/08/28/tiene-48-anos-y-trabaja___K6Kuobscg_290x290__1.jpg Chapt er19659010] "We must actually think of this theory as a construction from which its final form is not yet known. In its simplest section, the number of dimensions is 10 or 9 + 1, nine spatial and a temporary . Of these dimensions, six would describe a very small space, only 3 of the spatial dimensions would be large, which is what we see. However, the number may change depending on the circumstances . Just as water can be fluid or solid, the number of dimensions can be 10 or 11, or maybe less, "the physicist synthesizes.

At the time of presenting his famous" Conjecture Maldacena "he was a young Harvard theorist projection. The 1998 Conference on String Theory in Santa Barbara, California, physicists were so excited about this new vision that at the end of their presentation they began to sing "Delight in Your Theory, Maldacena" and danced in his honor. [19659002] To discover the duality between gravity and quantum field theory, he was the only Spanish-speaking scientist to receive the Lorentz Medal awarded last year by the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences of the Netherlands, while this year he won the Galileo Galilei Medal from the National Institute of Nuclear Physics of Italy.

  Juan Martín Maldacena received the title of honorary doctorate from the UBA's Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences p

Juan Martín Maldacena received the title of doctor honoris causa from UBA's Faculty of Science and Natural Sciences

Search daily for the missing pieces to gather a complete picture of the universe. "I try to understand how the interior of the black holes is described by quantum mechanics." His interest is that there are regions where space and time are greatly distorted .

Something that is connected to the so-called wormholes, that is, two black holes connected between yes . So far, no one has been discovered, but calculations may be possible. The speculation is that they would have an entrance door and at the other end a white hole, which would be an escape route.

"It would be possible to believe that a pair of black holes was connected through its interior. In fact, the simplest solution of Einstein's equations describes a pair of black holes that are connected by the interior but which cannot be entered on one side and the other. But it may happen that two people coming in through each of its ends are inside. It is as if two roads are joined together, but these are one-way roads, they only go to the future and the common interior is in that future. Once you are there, you cannot return, for the same reason that you cannot travel to the past, says Maldacena.

  Juan Maldacena's meeting with Stephen Hawking's

Juan Maldacena's meeting with Stephen Hawking's

The observations suggest that the history of the universe began some 13,810 million years ago . A few seconds after the Big Bang occurred, an accelerated stage of expansion began, known as the Inflation Period, where initial irregularities were created that would eventually condense matter and gesture seeds that would give rise to the galactic structures.

Original fluctuations are what make the universe not perfectly homogeneous. As you go back in time, the universe becomes more unified. Because a person's skin was smoother during adolescence, the universe was smoother, more regular when he was younger, say when he was between fractions of a second and 300,000 years old, Maldacena explains.

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