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Apollo 11: What Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin saw during dramatic Moon landing



The iconic images of the Eagle Lunar Module descent to the moon are ranked among the most incredible images ever recorded.

The black and white film is shot from a 16 mm time delay camera mounted in the Buzz Aldrin window on the right side of the Eagle Lunar Module. However, there is no information on what Apollo 11 Mission Commander Neil Armstrong saw from his window. "Because of the small size of the LM windows and the angle at which the film camera was mounted, the command Neil Armstrong saw when he flew and landed LM was not recorded," NASA explains in a statement on its site. [19659003] In an effort to gain insight into the last moments of the incredible mission, NASA has used images captured by its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to create a simulation of what Armstrong saw. Orbiter images have also been used to restore Aldrin's vision from the other side of the Lunar Module.

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Scientists utilize the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) to reconstruct the last three minutes of the eagle's runway using landmark navigation, and the height of callouts from the mission's voice recording. To do this, experts crushed information about the eagle's latitude, longitude, orientation, speed and height.

  This image shows the Lunar Module descent stage and the astronaut tracks. (NASA / Goddard / Arizona State University)

This image shows the Lunar Module descent stage and astronaut tracks. (NASA / Goddard / Arizona State University)

"From this banana information and high-resolution images from LROC Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC) and topography, we simulated what Armstrong saw in the last few minutes as he led the LM down to the Moon's surface," NASA explains. "When the video began, Armstrong could see the purpose of the rocky northeastern flank of the western crystal (190 meters [623 feet] diameter), which led him to take manual control and fly horizontally and looking for a safe landing site. At that time, only Armstrong saw the danger; he was too busy flying in the LM to discuss the situation with mission control. "

After navigating the eagle over the West Crater" bouldery ", Armstrong found a safe place to land the module about 1,640 feet from the crater and gently descend

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Just before the historic landing, Armstrong flew over a 131-foot diameter crater known as Little West Crater, later photographing the crater under his famous moonwalk.

  A view of Little West Crater. was taken by Neil Armstrong (NASA)

A view of Little West Crater This photograph was taken by Neil Armstrong (NASA)

About 234,000 miles away were Neil Armstrong's sons Mark and Rick at home in Houston and watched television, as their father left the eagle moon module and into the sides of history.

Rick was 12 years old when his father stepped out of the eagle moon module and famously praised "A small step for a man, a giant leap for humanity."

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"When he went out, nobody in the room heard what the words were because they were all" what did he say? "Rick told Fox News in a new interview." I heard it and I said "something about a little step" but then it wasn't clear what happened, I always remember. "

An estimated 650 million people around in the world

July 20 marks the 50th anniversary of Moon Landing

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NASA used a time-synchronized version of the original 16mm film from the Apollo 11 landing for to reconstruct Armstrong and Aldrin's views from Eagle Lander The First Men on the Moon site helped with the simulations by synchronizing the air-to-ground voice transfer with the movie.

  In this July 20, 1969 image made by television, astronaut Neil Armstrong to Apollo 11 on the ground surface Millions on earth gathered around television and radio, Armstrong heard this: "It is a small step for man, a giant hope for mankind." If he had returned from space, he immediately insisted that he had been wrong. He said it was a lost word in his famous one-piece object from the moon: "It's a small step for a" man. "It's just that people just didn't hear it."

On July 20, 1969 Picture from television, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong enters the moon's surface. Millions on the earth gathered around the TV and radio, Armstrong heard this saying, "It's a small step for man, a giant poop for humanity." But after returning from space, he immediately insisted that he had been misused. He said it was a lost word in his famous one-piece object from the moon: "It's a small step for a" man. "It's just that people just didn't hear it."
(NASA via AP)

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  File Photo - Neil Armstrong, Commander of Apollo 11, speaks to a technician during a pass at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, just before he sat down for the moon with other astronauts Michael Collins and Edwin & # 39; Buzz & # 39; Aldrin.

File Photo – Neil Armstrong, Commander of Apollo 11, spoke to a technician during a run at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, shortly before joining the moon with astronauts Michael Collins and Edwin & # 39; Buzz & # 39; Aldrin.
(Photo by Central Press / Getty Images)

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