Home / Science / Amazing Nasa Timelapse image reveals an anti-cyclone raging over the "marbled" surface of Jupiter

Amazing Nasa Timelapse image reveals an anti-cyclone raging over the "marbled" surface of Jupiter



A new Nasa timelapse shows a huge storm raging on Jupiter.

The swirling anti cyclone can be seen gradually moving across the surface of the gas giant in a series of pictures snapped just 17 minutes from the spacecraft Juno spacecraft. [19659002] Timelapse reveals the intricate details of Jupiter's marbled surface and captures several of the planet's "striking atmospheric properties", including jets and vortices in its northern northern tempered belt, Nasa said.

Browse for video

  A new Nasa timelapse shows a huge storm raging on Jupiter. An anti-cyclone white oval, called N5-AWO, can be seen to the far left of the first picture at the far left. It seems slightly higher in the second and third images as it moves over the Jupiter surface. A storm storm called Little Red Spot is visible near the bottom of the other and the third image

A new Nasa timelapse shows a big storm raging on Jupiter. An anti-cyclone white oval, called N5-AWO, can be seen to the far left of the first picture at the far left. It seems slightly higher in the second and third images as it moves over the Jupiter surface. A storm storm called Little Red Spot is visible near the bottom of the second and third images

From the left to the right, the sequence is shot between 00:54 and 1:11 am ET (5:54 and 6:11 AM BST) on the 16th July as Juno spacecraft performed its 14th near the airport of Jupiter.

A large anti-cyclone – a powerful storm where winds flow in the opposite direction to the flow around a region of low pressure – can be seen as a white oval depicted in the center of the left of the planet on the first image from the left.

Dubbad N5-AWO, the same storm can be seen as traveling a bit higher in the second and third images because it quickly moves over the Jupiter surface, which measures more than 10,000 times the size of the earth.

Another storm, called Little Red Spot, can be seen at the bottom of second and third images.

The massive racial weather event, found in Jupiter's northern hemisphere, is the third largest anti-cyclone worm on the planet – stretches around 3,700 miles (6000km) long.

The red-orange band featured in the fourth and fifth image is the North North Temperate Belt, a series of atmospheric jet streams and vortices.

  Juno has orbited Jupiter since 2016. This color-enhanced image was taken on May 24th, 02:31 ET (24:30), because the spacecraft performed its 13th closest aviation city of Jupiter. At that time, Juno was about 44,300 kilometers from the clouds of the planet, across a south latitude of 71 degrees.

Juno has crooked Jupiter since 2016. This color enlarged image was taken at 02:31 ET (7:30 AM BST) on May 24th, as the spacecraft performed its 13th near the airport of Jupiter. By that time, Juno was about 44,300 kilometers from the clouds of the planet, above a 71 degrees south latitude.

The timeline was snapped by Juno JunoCam display while the spacecraft was set at an altitude of about 15 700 to 3 900 miles (25,300 to 6,200 kilometers) from planet's cloud peaks.

JunoCam's raw images are accessible to the public to read and process themselves, and the schedule was created by national researchers Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran, Nasa.

Striking atmospheric properties in Jupiter's northern hemisphere are captured in this series of color-enhanced images from Nasa Juno spacecraft, "the space agency adds in a statement.

Juno has circled Jupiter since 2016 to collect data from the mysterious planet

Earlier this month, spacecraft data was used to solve a long-lasting mystery that lies behind Jupiter's distinctive colored bands.

Several strong currents flow from west to east in Jupiter's atmosphere, resembling Earth's beam currents.

But in contrast to the Earth where the currents flow across the surface, Jupiter's currents are more even and there are no continents and mountains under Jupiter's atmosphere to prevent the flow of jet streams.

WHAT IS NASA'S JUNO MISSION TO JUPITER?

  The Juno Sounder reached Jupiter 2016 after a five year 1.8 billion mile journey from earth

The Juno probe reached Jupiter 2016 after a five-year 1.8 billion mile journey from the earth

Juno probe reached Jupiter on July 4th 2016 after a five year 19 billion miles (2.8 billion miles) travel from the ground.

After a successful braking operation, it entered a long polar crossroads that fly to within 3,100 miles (5,000 km) of the peaking clouds of the planet.

The probe foamed within 2,600 miles (4,200km) of the clouds of the planet once every fourteen – too close to providing global coverage in a single image.

No previous spacecraft has cropped so close to Jupiter, although two others have been sent to their

To complete their risky mission, Juno survived a radiation radiation storm generated by Jupiter's powerful magnetic field.

Maelstrom of high energy particles traveling at almost the speed of light is the toughest radiation environment in the solar system.

In order to cope with the conditions, the spacecraft was protected with special radiation-cured wire and sensor protection. [19659002] The all-encompassing brain – the spacecraft's flying computer – was housed in an armored titanium vault and weighs almost 172 kg.

The vessel is expected to study the composition of the planet's atmosphere until 2021.

As a result, the jet currents on Jupiter are much easier than those on earth, causing less turbulence in the upper atmosphere.

Clouds of ammonia at Jupiter are outside the atmosphere carried by these beam currents to form Jupiter's regimented colored bands.

Unlike the Earth, our solar system's largest planet has no solid surface – it's a completely gaseous planet consisting mainly of hydrogen and helium.

  Nasa's Juno Spacecraft took this color-enhanced image on May 24 at 1:23 ET ET (6:23 AM BST), because the spacecraft performed its 13th closest Jupiter Air Force. The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, considering the various swirling cloud formations, Nasa

Nasa Juno Spacecraft took this color-enhanced image on May 24, as the spacecraft was performed at 1:23 ET ET (6:23 AM BST ). its 13th near the airport of Jupiter. The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, considering the various swirling cloud formations, said Nasa

An international team of researchers, including the Australian National University (ANU), recently studied evidence from Nasa Juno spacecraft that investigated these layers of gases.

This showed that Jupiter's beam currents reach as deep as 1,800 miles under the Jupiter clouds, which are shades of white, red, orange, brown and yellow.

Experts say that the interaction between Jupiter's atmosphere and its magnetic field is responsible for the bright layers that appear on the planet's surface.
Source link