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Amazing close-ups of the planet captured by NASA's Juno probe



Oil paintings swirling, stormy storms and Jupiter's famous "Great Red Spot": Amazing close-ups of the planet captured by NASA's Juno probe

  • Amazing images captured by NASA space telescope JunoCam showing swirling gas clouds covering Jupiter [19659003] The dramatic images of Jupiter's Chaotic and Turbulent Clouds Colored by NASA Techniques
  • Junocam is designed to take pictures of the planet's polar regions to provide clues as to how it was formed
  • powerful spacecraft launched in 2011 and entered a polar orbit of Jupiter in July 2016
5, 2019 |

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Amazing images of the swirling gas clouds and raging storms covering Jupiter have been revealed by NASA.

The space company's Juno probe captures the images using its built-in camera, known as JunoCam.

It was specially designed to take pictures of the planet's polar regions in the quest to seek clues about how the planet was formed.

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  Despite the beauty of the planet

Despite the planet's beautiful "cloud" captures captured Jupiter's cloud-covered planet may not even have a surface that humans could stand on

Juno was launched on August 5, 2011 before entering into a polar orbit of the planet in July 2016.

JunoCam captured these close-up images of Jupiter's poles, as well as the envelope of swirling clouds covering the gas giant in recent months.

Jupiter is two and a half times the size of all other planets in the solar system combined and experts debate whether its cloud cover hides a solid core or whether the planet is entirely composed of gases.

The latest images of Jupiter's swirling cloud formation were processed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

While there are plenty of images on the planet's northern hemisphere, the new images show Jupiter's southern hemisphere, which has often been depicted.

  NASA's Juno orbiter probe has revealed detailed images of the spinning gas clouds covering Jupiter. JunoCam captured close-up images of Jupiter's poles, as well as the envelope of swirling clouds covering the gas giant.

NASA's Juno orbiter probe has revealed detailed images of the spinning gas clouds covering Jupiter. JunoCam captured close-up images of Jupiter's poles, as well as the envelope of swirling clouds covering the gas giant.

  While there are plenty of pictures on the planet's northern hemisphere, the new images show Jupiter's southern hemisphere. The latest images of Jupiter's swirling cloud formation were processed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

While there are plenty of images on the planet's northern hemisphere, the new images show Jupiter's southern hemisphere. The latest images of Jupiter's swirling cloud information were processed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  The stunning close-up detail was captured by the camera on the spacecraft called JunoCam, which is specially designed to take pictures of the planet's polar regions

The stunning close-up detail was captured by the camera on the spacecraft called JunoCam

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a giant oval of crimson-colored clouds on the Jupiter's southern hemisphere that runs counterclockwise around the oval circumference.

Jupiter's Great Red Spot 19659012] The biggest storm in the solar system, it seems like a deep red orb surrounded by layers of pale yellow, orange and white.

Trapped between two The big red spot is an anticyclone that twists around a center of high atmospheric pressure that causes it to rotate in the opposite direction to hurricanes on Earth.

  Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a giant oval of crimson-colored clouds in the Jupiter's Southern Hemisphere that runs counterclockwise around the oval circumference

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a giant oval with crimson-colored clouds in the Jupiter's southern hemisphere that counterclockwise around the oval's circumference

Winds inside the storm have been measured in several hundred miles per hour, with wind gusts greater than any storm on earth, Nasa astronomers have said.

At the end of the 19th century, it was estimated to be about 35,000 miles (about 56,000 km) in diameter – wide enough for four soils to fit side by side.

The Great Red Spot is 10 times as wide as the Earth and measures 10,000 miles next to April 3, 2017. It gradually grows over time.

The solar powered spacecraft that left the Earth eight years ago made history by entering the Jupiter's orbit.

Nasa Juno probe fired its main rocket engine at 4.18 am BST (11.18 pm ET) 2011, slowing down from a speed of 165,000 km / h.

With Juno on autopilot, the delicate choreographed tube came without the help of ground controllers, so the spacecraft's mission control broke out with cheers and applause when the track was confirmed at 4:53 am BST (11.53 pm ET).

  Nasa Juno probe fired its main rocket engine at 4.18 am BST (11.18pm ET) 2011, slowing down from a speed of 165,000km / h to fall into a sweeping orbit around the planet.

Nasa Juno probe fired its main rocket engine at 4.18 am BST (11.18 pm ET) in 2011, slowing down from a speed of 165,000 mph (265,000 kph) enough to let into a sweeping orbit around the planet .

Jupiter's Great Red Spot has long fascinated astronomers, with their gigantic swirling storms and hurricane strength.

It was observed for the first time with certainty 150 years ago, appearing through the telescope due to its reddish color against the white, yellowish and ocher clouds that contrast with the rest of the planet.

Despite many studies done on the storm, its nature poses a major challenge to planetary meteorologists.

Last year, researchers have revealed what is really happening in the storm – and found that its center is strangely calm.

While the winds reach 450mph (724kph) at the edge, in the middle they are only 25mph (40kph)

Experts have studied the latest evidence gathered from the Nasa Juno spacecraft to reveal the reason why gases form bands on Jupiter.

Ammonium clouds in Jupiter's outer atmosphere are worn by jet currents to form Jupiter's recorded colored bands.

Jupiter's jet currents reach as deep as 1,800 miles under Jupiter's clouds, which are shades of white, red, orange, brown and yellow.

The gas in Jupiter's interior is magnetized, which the researchers believe explains why the jet currents go as deep as they do but do not go deeper.

There are no continents and mountains under Jupiter's atmosphere to prevent the path of the jet.

This makes jet currents on Jupiter easier than those on Earth and causes less turbulence in their upper atmosphere.

The study, conducted by an international research group led by Agustín Sánchez-Lavega, found a "rich diversity" of clouds within the large red spot.

& # 39; These phenomena are limited to a thin layer only 50 miles thick, representing the ceiling of the site's clouds, while inside the site probably goes down to a depth of a few hundred kilometers, "the researchers said in November 2018. [19659011] It contains cumulus clouds of cluster sized produced by condensation of ammonia vapor, narrow gravitational waves similar to those forming on the earth when the wind blows on mountain peaks.

But the calm rests in the center where the clouds move by rotating in the opposite direction at maximum speeds at only 25 km / h (25 km / h), according to the team.

Despite the many studies conducted on the storm, its nature poses a major challenge to planetary meteorologists.

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