Home / Science / A dazzling fireball over California exposed Skywatchers this week! See the pictures.

A dazzling fireball over California exposed Skywatchers this week! See the pictures.



  A dazzling fireball over California exposed Skywatchers this week! See the pictures.

Bay Area Meteor on December 19, 2018, photographed by David Smoyer from the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe.

Credit: David Smoyer

Lots of people have to admire and puzzle over, the fireball that blew up from the northern California coast just after sunset on Wednesday 1

9 December.

People as far south as Anaheim and as far north as Oregon City of Medford saw the meteor or track it left behind, according to an observation map presented by the American Meteor Society (AMS). It tracked linged in the sky for a while – long enough to be turned by winds in high altitude in a strange cork screw shape, which meant that some people on Twitter would speculate that it was a counterpart of a vehicle of some kind. [19659005] The sky show was visible far in the east as well. For example, David Smoyer saw it from the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe. [The Brilliant California Fireball of Dec. 19, 2018 in Photos]

  Although the sun had already set, the meteor track was high enough in the sky to catch some rays.

Although the sun had already set, the meteor track was high enough in the sky to catch the little sun rays were spectacular on their own, but when this radiant fire ball stretched across the western sky, it lit up and appeared to break into several pieces and left a glowing junk that continued for about 20 minutes, "Smoyer told Space.com via email.

" I've been fortunate to see a lot of meteors and lots of bright fireballs, including dozens during the 2001 meteor disturbance from Leonid, but This was the brightest and most impressive I can remember, says Smoyer.

"I've been fortunate enough to see a lot of meteors and lots of bright fireballs, including dozens during the 2001 meteor disturbance from Leonid, but this was the brightest and most impressive I can remember," Smoyer Space.com said via E-mail.

Credit: David Smoyer

The fireball track glowed a wonderful silver white as the sky was darkened, because it was high enough to catch some rays from the sun. Mark O & # 39; Lone saw the cloudy property from San Rafael, just north of San Francisco.

"I pulled down the stairs, my arms full of Christmas presents, when I discovered this unusual sight," he told Space.com via e-mail

  Mark O & # 39; Lone caught this view of the fireball's track from San Rafael, just north of San Francisco.

Mark O & # 39; Lone captured this notion of the fireball's track from San Rafael, just north of San Francisco. 19659009] Credit: Mark O & # 39; Lone

Observations of people like Smoyer and O & # 39; Lone helped scientists track the path of the fireball. (If you wonder, "fireball" is a technical term, it refers to every meteor that shines at least as strong as Venus in the night sky.)

"An analysis of the eyewitness book shows that the meteor was first visible at a height of 48 miles [77 kilometers] over the Pacific Ocean about 50 miles [80 km] west of the entrance to San Francisco Bay, "researchers at the Meteoroid Environment Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, wrote in a blog post Thursday (December 20).

  Laura Lea Evans cracked this shot of the meteor from Reno, Nevada, on the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Laura Lea Evans cracked this shot of the meteor of Reno, Nevada, on the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada mountains.

Credit: Laura Lea Evans

"Movement west of south at 63,000 mph [101,000 km/h] managed to survive just one second or so before ablating and breaking at a height of 34 miles [55 km] over the sea," they added .

Fireballs are not rare; several thousand of them occur every day around the world, according to AMS. But most of these dramatic meteors reached over the open sea or thin populations. And they just flip short, so you have to be quite lucky even to see one that spans your city or city – unless it leaves a long-lasting track that Wednesday's fireball did.

Editor's Note: ] If you got a great photo of California Fireball that you want to share with Space.com and our news partners for any story or photo gallery, send comments and photos to: spacephotos @ space. com.

Mike Wall's book about the search for alien life, " Out There " (Grand Central Publishing, 2018, illustrated by Karl Tate ) is out now. Follow him on Twitter @michaeldwall . Follow us @Spacedotcom or Facebook . Originally published on Space.com .


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